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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2011, 10:00 
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This topic is created with only one purpose in mind, and that purpose is the have a good guide for all people who want to develop good shakehand strokes, or players who want to improve their strokes.
All sorts of shots can be discussed in this topic, but please remember that everyone has a different stroke. What might work perfectly for me doesn't have to be so perfect for another person. A perfect stroke isn't the same as the most effective one.

The grip

The grip is called the ‘shakehand grip’ because you hold the blade like you would shake a person’s hand. If you’re a right handed player lift your blade in the air with your left hand. Make sure the handle is pointing downwards.
With your free hand you should shake hands with your blade. Your grip should be about the same as the pictures below.

Image
Image

Variations always happen, and that’s completely normal. Let’s take a look at some of the shakehand pro’s. Notice they always hold their blade a little different, and usually that reflects a personal style.
Kong Linghui had a quite backhand orientated game, whilst Wang Liqin is all about hitting big forehands. Let’s take a look at their grip. First two pictures are Kong’s grip, the last two are from Liqin.

Image
Image
Image
Image

Two ‘match’ pictures. (Zhang Jike and Ma Long)

Image
Image

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Forehand counterhit

Once we have the correct grip we can move on to the strokes. The first basic stroke is the forehand counter.
If you’re a right handed player the forehand is on the right side of your body. The blade should be taken backhands and down until it reaches somewhere around waist level. There should always be enough space to hit the shot. If you don’t make enough space your elbow will be cramped into your body, which results in weaker shots.

You have the correct amount of distance when there is a slight ‘V’shape between your elbow and your arms. The ‘V’ is clearly visible when Ma Long hits a forehand topspin shot.

Image

Once you’re in the position you move the bat upwards until you have reached eye level. The blade should finish between your eyes. If you hit your head your swing is too long. Always keep a few centimeters between your head and your blade.
The feet need to be apart. Take a wide stance so you can bend downwards. If your feet are too close to each other it’s very difficult to get down. During a warmup this doesn’t sound very necessary, but once your level raises you will benefit a lot from good footwork.

Remember: the left foot should always be in front during your forehand stroke. Otherwise it’s very difficult to transfer your weight. Don’t put your left foot too much in front; half a foot length to ¾ of a foot length should be enough.

When you start hitting the shot always take the ball in front of you. The best point would be when the ball is at its highest point. If you take it earlier you have to lift the ball over the net, making it curve more. That’s hard to do without much spin.
If you take the ball late it’s difficult to generate enough power.

To get a good look at the forehand counter you should watch this video. It’s made by ttEDGe. This site is made by Australian professionals William Henzell and Robert Frank. They provide videos for instructional purpose, and I will use some of them throughout this tutorial. If you enjoy them please take a look at their website: http://www.ttedge.com



------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Forehand topspin

The forehand topspin has the same basics as the forehand counterhit. Left foot in front of your right foot. We have to make 2 types of topspin shots: against backspin, and against block.

against backspin: make sure to go down your blade until it’s about knee height. Move the blade up until you have the same finishing position as with the counterhit.

against block: don't go down as much with your blade. The ball will be back upon your side in no time at all, and there is no time to prepare for very long strokes. Perfect height would be between your knees and your waist.

The following things should be done when playing both strokes: you will generate more power when you transfer your weight from your right hip to your left hip. The more weight you can transfer the faster your shot will be.

The blade should be closed more than during a counterhit. You will get the highest amount of spin when you brush the ball. Close your blade to make sure this brush effect is happening. Don’t close it too much, that will only make your shot weaker.

Good videos

Topspin against block:


Topspin against backspin:


Ma Long (0.33 and onwards):

Notice how his swing shortens at the end of the video. He did this on purpose. He got closer to the table, started taking the ball earlier and there was no time for a big swing.

Bonus video:

The last video is Zhang Jike playing Joo se Hyuk. Joo is a chopper, and notice how low Zhang had his blade. Sometimes even under the knees. When playing a faster topspin (at 0:16) he clearly has a shorter swing.

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Backhand counter

Another basic shot is the backhand counter. It is a more compact swing than the forehand, and usually relies more on technique and timing than muscle power. Another thing to notice at the backhand side is that there is much more variation possible than on the forehand side. Some players like to take the ball more to the left or right. This is the way I have been taught, and that's how I teach others.


The backhand counter is started on the left side of your body, and finishes on the right side. The starting position is just short of your belly. If you take the blade further backwards you’ll hit your shirt, which can be wet, resulting in a shot which will go into the net. If you have a shorter stroke you won’t get as much speed. In that case you rely more on the power created by your opponent, which makes you vulnerable against players who don’t have much power either. The face of the blade should be quite open. Make sure you have enough space for your arm to swing, don’t put your elbow in your body!

The blade moves forwards and a bit upwards, until your arm is stretched. By stretching your arm you have created a long swing, which ensures you generate enough power. During this motion you will also close your blade. You start with a very open blade face, and it should close during the shot. At the end of your swing the rubber should be parallel to the ground.

When playing this shot you should have a wide stance, just like the forehand counter. I will mention this again; it might sound unnecessary to bend down when doing a simple warm-up, but when you reach a higher level it’s vital to get down very well.

The feet should be in a different position than during the forehand stroke. On the forehand stroke the left feet is in front, on a backhand shot he feet should be parallel to each other.

I mentioned at the forehand stroke it's important to take the ball in front of you, otherwise you will lose power. On the backhand side it's absolutely necessary to take the ball in front of you. The backhand has a shorter stroke and relies more on timing. Therefore the damage is greater at the backhand side when you take the ball too late. Don’t hit the ball to early as well. You'll start with a very open blade, which causes the ball to go upwards. It will go over the table because the spin needed to pull it down isn't provided on the right time.

Take a look at this video to get a better look at the backhand counter.



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Backhand topspin

The backhand topspin has the same basics as the backhand counterhit. The feet remain in the same position: parallel to each other. Again we have to distinct 2 types of topspin shots: against backspin, and against block.

against backspin: Go down with your blade until you reach knee height. Make sure it’s the inside of your knee, and not the outside. Close your blade face a little, if you don’t close your blade it’s very hard to get good spin on the ball. Move upwards until you have reached the same finishing position as with the backhand counter. Brush at the back of the ball to get as much topspin as possible.

Note: if the backspin is too heavy to lift move the blade even more upwards.

against block: Take your blade down until it’s about waist level. Close your blade and finish at the same position as the backhand counterhit. Make sure to hit the ball in front of you!

If you keep hitting the ball over the table there are 2 possibilities:
1) You don’t hit the ball early enough
2) Your blade is to open

Usually it’s because people take the ball too late, if that’s not the case they keep their blade to open. This results in a sort of pushing or guiding the ball over the net, and not in a good topspin stroke.
Also take a look at the amount of space you create with your arms. Make sure the elbow isn’t touching your body, if it is you don’t have enough space.

The following things should be done when playing both strokes: you will generate more power when you transfer your weight from your left hip to your right hip. The more weight you can transfer the faster your shot will be.

The blade should be closed more than during a counterhit. You will get the highest amount of spin when you brush the ball. Close your blade to make sure this brush effect is happening. Don’t close it too much, that will only make your shot weaker.

Some videos

Topspin against backspin:


Topspin against block:


Topspin against block (TTedge):


The explanation provided by TTedge is slightly different than mine. That doesn’t make it any worse or any better. It’s a different point of view (and how I’ve been taught), and one can hit great backhands with either technique.


Some pros in action
Ma Long:


Ma Long (topspin) & Yan An (counterhit):


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Advanced back countertopspin

When you have reached a higher level the technique I mentioned above isn't that useful anymore. It can still be used when you have time to swing at the ball, but not when both players are close to the table and putting pressure on the opponent. It just takes to much time to swing at the ball. The other situation you can use this shot in is when you are close to the table and your opponent is further away and hitting very hard. If that situation isn't the case the technique explained below isn't useful at all. It relies on speed generated in the rally, developing speed isn't it's biggest strength.

This shot starts at the same position as the backhand topspin, but the face of the blade should be a bit more closed. This is needed because of the extreme spin needed to get the ball on the table.
The biggest difference is in the swing. With the backhand topspin you let the blade drop and you swing with your shoulder, upper arm and the lower arm. With this technique you will only use the lower arm. The upper arm should be free to swing, but it should be relaxed, no power should come from that area.
The shot itself a a quick snap motion of the lower arm. It should end with a closed blade, just like a normal topspin.

The best example I have is a rally between Ma Long and Zhang Jike. Watch from 11:04 to 11:50.




Please note: when Zhang had a little bit of extra time he took a longer swing on his backhand. When he got a faster shot his swing shortened. Take a look at his swing at 11:27 and 11:30, and compare this with his other swings.

Practice makes perfect with this shot. It is a very difficult shot, since it requires a spot on timing, a good technique, and above all a good shot selection. If you play this shot at the wrong time ( a slow ball, or away from the table) it won’t do much damage to the opponent. When played correctly (close to the table when the ball has a lot of speed) it can be a devastating shot.

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Last edited by cstt on 11 Dec 2011, 02:23, edited 5 times in total.

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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2011, 10:01 
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Blocking

In table tennis it’s very hard for both players to be attacking. When you think the speed is to high or the opponent is using your speed to much you can use a block. A block is basically a short stroke, and you use most of the speed of the opponent to get the ball over the net.
One of the key points of blocking is being in a good position. If you don’t move well and just stretch your arm towards the ball your blocking game will never be good. Make sure your body is behind the ball and your blocking game will be ready for the task ahead.
The blocking technique is very similar to a counterhit, the difference is that a block has a shorter swing and not as much body rotation.
The videos probably explain it better than I can. So let’s just take a look at both of them.




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Punch blocking

Normal blocking can be considered as a defensive stroke. A punch block is an attacking stroke, and it can be used with great effectiveness. Jan Ove Waldner and Jorgen person had some terrific punch blocks.
Again the technique is similar to a counterhit. The difference is that we are really going to smash trough the ball. Make sure you have a thick contact, try to get as little spin as possible. This technique is easier on the backhand side, so it can be a wise move to start on the backhand. Always hit down in your shot, never up! If you do hit upwards I can guarantee you the ball will go over the table.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OSe7vM_L ... re=related

First point is a really good example.

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Push

The push can be used in different situations, for example returning serve. A push creates backspin, which makes it more difficult for the opponent to topspin the ball. The best way to play a push is like this:
Start at chest height, with an open blade. With open I mean almost horizontal. The more horizontal it is the more backspin you can give.

Backhand push

From somewhere between chest and belly height slice down at the ball, like you would slice cheese. By varying the arm speed you can get more or less spin. Just try for yourself what works best.
Make sure your stroke doesn’t get to long, it doesn’t add any spin to your shot. Keep it nice and simple.



Forehand push

The forehand push is a bit more difficult to master, but you should get the hang of this quite quickly. This shot is a bit further away from your body, that’s the reason it’s more difficult to master.
Make sure you have some space in elbow before playing this shot, the blade should be a bit in front of your body. Again, make sure you have an open blade, just like on the backhand push.
Extend your arm from this point on to create backspin. The same rules apply on the forehand, vary your arm speed to create more or less spin.


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Last edited by cstt on 13 Feb 2012, 00:47, edited 6 times in total.

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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2011, 10:01 
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Until this point we have focused on strokes in a rally, shots which are affected by the opponent. The serve is the only shot in a rally where only you can decide what you want to do with your shot. This makes it in my eyes the most important shot there is, yet we don’t spend a lot of time practicing the serve.

Why? Because having a good serve isn’t as cool as hitting a big forehand or backhand. Yet the serve can be more effective. A good serve can setup a third ball attack which can end the rally quickly. Not a lot of energy has been wasted in a long rally and the pressure is right back at the opponent. So it can also become a mental weapon. Make good use of the serve!

I will start with explaining the backhand serve, it is usually easier to start with the backhand. However, this can be very personal. My backhand serve for example is very weak so I only serve forehand serves. With the forehand the stroke can be a bit more difficult, but it is possible to get more spin. After the backhand I’m going to move on with the forehand.
Please note I’m providing a basic technique for the serve. There are a lot of ways to serve, and I can’t talk about all of them simply because I don’t master all of them and reason number two is that this guide would become to big. If you are interested in more serves you could take a look at the following serves: reverse pendulum, tomahawk, reverse tomahawk or the windshield wiper serve.

Before I start I want to talk about 2 important rules for the serve:
1) Throw the ball vertically upwards, at least 15 cm
2) The ball should always be visible, hiding isn’t allowed (you are allowed to hide your blade)

Let’s distinguish 4 types of spin we can put on a ball:
- backspin
- topspin
- sidespin
- no spin

It is virtually impossible to get only one type of spin on a shot. When you for example try to hit a sidespin serve it is very well possible there is also some topspin on the ball. This doesn’t make a serve better or worse, keep that in mind. If you can vary that amount well it is not a liability, but a weapon!

Backhand serve
There is a basic position for every backhand serve. The blade should be around chest height, and it should also be close to your body. In order to generate spin we need arm speed, which we can only generate by giving the arm space and time to swing. So don’t make this swing shorter. The rest of the stroke is mostly decided by the spin you want to give to the ball.

Backspin
I’m going to start with a backspin serve. The backspin serve on the backhand is almost the same technique as the push. Start of your chest and just slice down at al the ball. A thin contact will give more spin than a closed contact. Make sure your rubber is facing upwards when playing this stroke, this will give you the most amount of spin.
It’s basically the same stroke as the push, the stroke is only a bit longer due to starting around your chest. This is because of the extra energy which your opponent has put into the ball on his stroke.


Image
The red line would give the best point of impact for backspin. The more underneath you can get the more backspin you will give.

Topspin
We want the same basic position for this serve, but we are going to start lower. We are not going to slice down at the ball this time, we are going to brush up against the back of the ball. If we start around chest height it is virtually impossible to go up with the stroke.
Just try to pull your blade up. The faster you can do this the more topspin you will get. Try to get the rubbers in a 90 degrees angle with the table. This ensures the most spin.
You can’t reach the net? Try to open your blade a bit more (80 degrees angle instead of 90) or try to pull your blade up faster.
This is one of the hardest serves to pull off in the beginning, just keep practicing and the results will come eventually.

Image
The red line indicates the best point of impact once again. Please move from low to high, and not the other way round.

Sidespin
This shot is fun! I can give a really good feeling to pull of a good backhand sidespin serve.
We have the same basic position as with the other serves, however the height should be in between the backspin and the topspin serve. With the sidespin serve it’s only about sidespin movement. So we want the face of the blade to make a 90 degree angle with the angle. If you look down at the blade you should only be able to see the edge, and not much of the rubbers.

We are going to move the blade from one side to another. If you want to move the ball to the left start at the left side of your chest, and move horizontally to your other side. The more armspeed you get the more kick your serve will get.
You probably don’t have to be Einstein to guess which way you’ll have to move your blade if you want to ball move to the left. That’s correct, from right to left. The stroke itself remains the same.

Your serves are going into the net, or over the table? Try to work on your contact, it is probably to thin, or to thick. If you hit it to thick you will give to much forwards energy, and the ball will go long. Don’t be afraid to close your blade to a 90 degree angle. Just close your eyes and let your muscles do the work for you.

If you hit it in the net there are 2 possibilities. The most obvious one is armspeed. Give to much speed and the ball goes long, give to little and the ball drops in the net. The other possibility is that you let the ball bounce to close to the net. Try to find your point on the table where you want it to bounce.
Be careful with keeping this serve short. It is very easy to hit it with a bit more topspin than you anticipated and let the ball bounce to high. Once that happens you well most certainly get a flick from your opponent, and a fast one to!

Image
Red line: best point of impact, at the side of the ball.



No spin serve
This one can be very clever and useful, however I suggest only using it on short serves. The shot is almost the same as the backspin serve. The some starting position, and the same stroke. However, you’re not making speed with your arm. You sort of let the ball bounce off your blade and towards the net. When your opponent tries to push this one it almost certainly goes long.
Don’t try to add any speed, try to get it as low and slow as possible.

Image
Since the motion is the same you also want to the same contact point as with a backspin serve.

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Last edited by cstt on 13 May 2012, 01:48, edited 6 times in total.

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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2011, 10:02 
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Reserved ;)

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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2011, 10:02 
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I will continue to write technical stuff, and when it's completely finished I will probably publish it as a PDF file. However, much is still needed to be done before we reach that point. I will discuss these strokes:
Serve
Receiving serve
Smashing
Lobbing
Chopping

If someone could help me or even write the chopping part that would greatly help me. I don't chop at all, I know how to play against them, but nothing else. Advice or help would be greatly appreciated. :)

English is not my native language. It could happen that something isn't completely clear, or maybe I have made errors in grammer. :) Please point them out to me, it will only make this guide better. ;)

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Last edited by cstt on 12 May 2012, 19:31, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2011, 10:24 
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Awesome guide, thank you cstt! :clap: :clap: :clap: I've stickied the topic as it's a very useful guide and topic that we can refer to as a reference. :up: :up: :up:

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PostPosted: 25 Nov 2011, 10:46 
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very handy collection of material there cstt.. gonna use that im my coaching

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PostPosted: 26 Nov 2011, 09:15 
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Awesome post, that certainly helps me in learning the right strokes, especially my backhand strokes in normal rubbers.
Thanks. :clap: :up:

Looking forward for more. :)


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PostPosted: 26 Nov 2011, 11:42 
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Your welcome :) It could be a week, maybe more before I post some new things. I have a busy schedule, and this takes a lot of time. Only on the grip and forehand alone I spent a few hours.
Backhand part also took at least an hour and a half. But I hope to get 2 or 3 parts each week. :)

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PostPosted: 26 Nov 2011, 13:12 
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Nice work cstt. I'm sure there will be many who find this a handy reference! :clap:

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PostPosted: 26 Nov 2011, 13:26 
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if only there was one for penhold players :P :?:

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PostPosted: 26 Nov 2011, 13:55 
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Sorry, can't help you with Penhold. Someone else has to do that part :P

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PostPosted: 26 Nov 2011, 13:57 
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decoy wrote:
if only there was one for penhold players :P :?:


The solution is obvious. Use this info and become a better SH player than you ever will be as a PH player :P :lol:

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PostPosted: 27 Nov 2011, 02:43 
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RebornTTEvnglist wrote:
decoy wrote:
if only there was one for penhold players :P :?:


The solution is obvious. Use this info and become a better SH player than you ever will be as a PH player :P :lol:


if i do that them i will turn into a pips player who loops with pimples

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PostPosted: 27 Nov 2011, 03:57 
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I didn't say anything about pips, not am I planning to do so :)

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