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PostPosted: 02 Jan 2015, 18:48 
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PostPosted: 23 Jan 2015, 11:17 
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Dear readers,

I have a news for you.
NEXY found good friends in USA, and opened a new door.
William Waltrip has been sincere friend for me for long years in Korea, and now he is running new NEXY business in America with Sutanit Tangyingyang.

I trust both of them, and believe that they will run NEXY business with trust and detailed care.

And their web site will help people to reduce the cost for delivery.
Direct delivery from Korea to USA and Canada costs a lot, and that have been a main issue for many people in America, who love to buy NEXY.

Please, welcome my friends Willam and Sutanit, and have a look at their new web site www.nexyusa.com .

With thanks, Oscar from Korea.


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PostPosted: 23 Jan 2015, 12:29 
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nexy wrote:
Dear readers,

I have a news for you.
NEXY found good friends in USA, and opened a new door.
William Waltrip has been sincere friend for me for long years in Korea, and now he is running new NEXY business in America with Sutanit Tangyingyang.

I trust both of them, and believe that they will run NEXY business with trust and detailed care.

And their web site will help people to reduce the cost for delivery.
Direct delivery from Korea to USA and Canada costs a lot, and that have been a main issue for many people in America, who love to buy NEXY.

Please, welcome my friends Willam and Sutanit, and have a look at their new web site http://www.nexyusa.com .

With thanks, Oscar from Korea.


Congratulations Der_Echte :up: :clap:

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PostPosted: 23 Jan 2015, 19:24 
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nexy wrote:
Dear readers,

I have a news for you.
NEXY found good friends in USA, and opened a new door.
William Waltrip has been sincere friend for me for long years in Korea, and now he is running new NEXY business in America with Sutanit Tangyingyang.

I trust both of them, and believe that they will run NEXY business with trust and detailed care.

And their web site will help people to reduce the cost for delivery.
Direct delivery from Korea to USA and Canada costs a lot, and that have been a main issue for many people in America, who love to buy NEXY.

Please, welcome my friends Willam and Sutanit, and have a look at their new web site http://www.nexyusa.com .

With thanks, Oscar from Korea.

Fantastic news, especially since it's run by two of our forum favourites! :up: :up: :up:

There's an Intro thread for them here:
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=27224&p=288693

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PostPosted: 05 Feb 2015, 15:33 
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NEXY’S THREE-STAR BALL


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NEXY has released a new ball, and it was not developed overnight.

It took more than 2-years to investigate the properties that made a “good ball,” and finally we discovered a recipe to make a “great ball.”

If players look for a real value, we are quite sure that this ball will lead the market!



Key Features of the new NEXY ball:


Strong and durable. Many players are still using NEXY balls, even after 3-months of playing. The NEXY ball can withstand months of hard-hitting. => Some of the other balls cannot!

High, accurate bounce. Players can expect where the NEXY ball will come, because it has a steady and stable movement. The NEXY ball has higher bounce, which allows a vivid feeling during play. => Some of the other balls have lower bounce, and some actually have an irregular bounce, which distracts players.

Responsive. Responds quickly and positively to player’s strokes within expectable range. => Some of the other balls seem to absorb power and do not reach high speeds, even when exerting maximum power — this can cause a player to completely lose interest in playing.

Trustworthy movement. Enjoyable to play with — not too light, not too slow. => Some of the other balls are ultra-light and feel like a toy ball, and some are way too slow and heavy, which robs players of their enjoyment.






Seam vs. Seamless Ball.


The new NEXY ball has no seam.
I’d like to explain the different properties between seamless balls and balls with a seam.
You may discover why the NEXY ball is so good.



A Ball with a Seam

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When a ball with a seam is dissected, it is obvious that one part is thicker than the other.
This proves that the two halves were joined together.

If you analyze the thicker part, you would notice a small triangle that is not an isosceles triangle.

Therefore it cannot have an equal weight balance between the two hemispheres.



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A careful comparison between a seamed ball and a NEXY seamless ball reveals an obvious difference.
Many people believe that a round ball will have an expectable, stable bounce and movement.

However, the bounce is not only due to the external shape, but also the internal shape and the weight balance from inside.



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Look inside the NEXY ball.


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It has no seam!

Therefore, it has no weight problem, and the ball’s movement is stable and consistent.

Plastic balls have less elasticity, so when there is seam, the impact on the ball stops around the seam, because that part is thicker.



As a result, the thicker part has different bounce response, and the ball reacts and bounces differently depending upon where the ball impacts.
A plastic ball with a seam ball will also bounce differently according to where it hits the table.

In addition, it can easily break! These phenomena were not a factor with celluloid balls, because they are more elastic; so, even the seamed part did not alter the bounce and movement.

But with PVC material, the seam greatly influences the final movement and durability.



In conclusion, the seam generates irregular movements, inconsistent bounces, and is weaker than the seamless ball.





How does NEXY compare to other seamless balls?



Are all the balls made at the same factory the same?
No!

Each ball has its own recipe, and each brand has its own equity for that recipe. Just like rubbers, which are different even if manufactured at the same facility.

NEXY wanted to create a ball that is as close as possible to the Celluloid ball — not one that felt too light and fragile like a toy ball. We knew that players had an expected dynamic range for balls.



So, NEXY designed a ball that responds to the player’s power for each and every stroke.
If a player hits with more power, the ball will fly at a higher speed; if a player hits with less power, the ball will fly a slower speed.



For example, some of the other brand’s balls have a speed and spin limit, which as a result, limits the player’s playing ability.

But NEXY allows players to feel that they are playing with the right power, because the NEXY ball does not have any a built-in limit.


Meet this new ball, and enjoy NEXY’s latest triumph!

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PostPosted: 07 Feb 2015, 11:50 
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NEXY is proud to introduce CHEDECH!



The name comes from the Hebrew word meaning, “righteousness.”
People think righteousness is a matter of each person’s rightful share, but it’s also related to the social system and structure.

Righteousness should run through society, pressing what is right along the way.
With this in mind, NEXY envisioned Chedech as a wheel spinning its way through human history on the blade.


CHEDECH is NEXY’s 4th generation blade.
When NEXY released Kanaph, we had unique ideas about what would be good for poly ball play.
We called Kanaph a 3.5th generation blade because it was not the final answer! CHEDECH is our first 4th generation blade.




What is the functional uniqueness for 4th generation blades?



1. More of a focus on “point” than “plane.”
This means that 4th generation blades will have a deeper impact, and the power can be felt converging on a certain point.
The blade will not respond as a whole plane, thus vibration will decrease.


2. Deeper impact.
In general, the “depth” of the impact point will be deeper than the second and third generation blades.
The poly ball is bigger and has a heavier feeling, so the blade has to support the impact with a stronger force.
Therefore, the 4th generation blades will have more depth allowing the blade’s total force to support that point.


3. Wider sweet spot.
The poly ball is bigger and feels heavier, so players will need a more stable stroke.


4. Greater emphasis on speed.

The new poly ball era often requires more speed.
So, the element of speed is a higher priority than previous generations

(NEXY tried to converge on a certain area for all 3rd generation blades, not trying to scatter too many different speeds and features as 2nd generation).



In addition to the 4-points listed above, CHEDECH features an additional factor.
Previous generations of NEXY blades had three factors, i.e., “point,” “plane,” and “line.” But unlike “point” and “plane,” the factor “line” is mainly related to the surface wood.

NEXY has used Hinoki wood for many blades’ surfaces, because Hinoki excels in the feature of “line.” “Line” means the power to hold the ball and make the ball stick onto the surface.
When you play with Hinoki you can feel the ball is moving on the surface, as it feels sticky, and I call that “line” because the blade surface holds the ball and the ball rolls on one line on the blade.

This rolling feeling is a very important factor, and NEXY cherishes that feature. Many NEXY blades were made with a Hinoki top ply.


In order to welcome the “poly ball age,” NEXY is now proudly introducing a unique surface wood, which has a similar feeling as Hinoki, but slightly different.
It has less stickiness, which allows better control and an easier stroke.
However, it has a lot of power, with more durability than Hinoki wood. Hinoki has a very sophisticated character.

When it is cut thin, it does not embrace the ball with good control, so it needs to be cut thicker than typical surface wood layers.
But, when the ply is cut thick, it becomes too soft and there is a loss of speed.

So, it’s vital to find a right thickness per each blade design.
Yet, when we consider the poly ball’s heavier feeling and larger size, it’s not easy to make a good Hinoki surface blade.

CHEDECH uses Wenge wood in order to emulate the “line” characteristic of Hinoki when using a celluloid ball without sacrificing speed.



Alas! Meet NEXY’s new generation blade — CHEDECH!

It has a new surface and character.
NEXY vows to continue designing equipment to satisfy players around the world with unstoppable study and experimentation, supported by many years of experience.



And here goes CHEDECH to you.


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PostPosted: 02 Mar 2015, 16:55 
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PostPosted: 01 Jul 2015, 20:14 
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nexy wrote:
CHEDECH uses Wenge wood in order to emulate the “line” characteristic of Hinoki when using a celluloid ball without sacrificing speed.
What makes wenge play similar to hinoki? It is hard to find more different pairs of wood.


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PostPosted: 03 Jul 2015, 12:28 
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nexy wrote:
NEXY’S THREE-STAR BALL

Seam vs. Seamless Ball.


The new NEXY ball has no seam.


So isn't this another XSF OEM?? This was posted this last February!

Iskandar


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PostPosted: 07 Jul 2015, 23:58 
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Looks fantastic Nexy :-)
Perfect designs

But why did you change the shape to 158x150? I thought you said that 157x151 would be better suited for the new balls?

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PostPosted: 05 Jun 2016, 05:03 
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Finally, I had the chance to compare two of Nexy's more recent blades, Olam and Zealot. They both feature excellent build quality and craftsmanship. They also both share a lovely handle design, not thin, not short, and not chunky like a baseball bat. In play, the deliver as promised. I would say that Olam excels with compact strokes, and Zealot shines with fuller strokes. I would probably pair Olam with tacky rubbers and Zealot with grippy rubbers, but everyone would have their own preferences. Zealot has more of a "love at first stroke," while Olam is the kind of blade would grow on a player. I'm probably going with Zealot as my main blade, even though I use shorter strokes . . . probably because it doesn't make much difference with the way I play, and Z is for Zai. ;-)

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PostPosted: 07 Jun 2016, 15:32 
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Official Introduction of Zealot


It’s been quite some time since Nexy launched Zealot. As a designer, I feel obliged to write an official English introduction for each blade, but until now I could not find the time to do this for Zealot. Please forgive me. I’ve been extremely busy and a bit lazy. Of course, I wrote many pages of articles about how I came up with the basic idea for this blade’s design concept in the Korean language, but writing an English article has been delayed until now. But I think "better late than never." I am writing this English article to provide supportive information to whoever wants to better understand the major features of Zealot.

Zealot has been in production for over a year, and I can now see more clearly its good aspects. Therefore, this explanation will be based on a wider range of market feedback from Korean purchasers, and I believe that this article will be helpful for all the players interested in Zealot outside of Korea.


Summary of Nexy’s Fourth Generation Blades

Let me begin with a brief summary of Nexy’s Fourth Generation blades. Nexy started the Fourth Generation by releasing Kanaph (3.5th Gen.), followed by Chedech (4th). It’s not easy to provide one clear image of the Fourth Generation because Nexy did not focus on one specific feature as we did with the Third Generation, which paid particular attention to the “bang impact.” All Third Generation blades shared that general feature and function, and the sizes were also fairly uniform. Nexy experimented with many different types of blades throughout the First and Second Generations. This helped us determine the focus for the Third Generation. Therefore, players were sure to find similar features throughout the various blades of that series.


The Third Generation blades focused on the following factors:

1. Deep touch: I tried to deepen the feeling of impact inside the blade. That meant players could have a “bang impact” during exertion of a full swing movement.

2. Attacking size & weight balance: Most Third Generation blades aimed at a fast and powerful looping ability. In order to optimize this feature, I designed most of the blades with a similar size (157x150) and thickness (5.7mm~6.0mm). You might be thinking that I was trying to widen the material choices based on one blade shape.

3. Milder dual speed: In the Second Generation, I aimed at maximizing the range of the “dual speed” system for many blades. Lissom, with a large speed gap between the speed of attacking and blocking, could be acknowledged as a good weapon for players who want to accomplish steady and stable looping from all positions. Calix is a thin attacking blade with very good touch and an extreme dual speed system. It’s still fast, considering its 4.9mm thickness. With Calix 2 and Qabod, players could feel the adjusted dual speed. These blades are very powerful and versatile for continuous and oppressing attacking style, which connected Nexy’s Second and Third Generations.


Nexy can safely summarize the goal for the Third Generation as such: Featured a dual speed system that was not too shallow nor too deep in order to avoid being too exotic for players. The Kim Jung Hoon blade is a good example of the milder version dual speed system, which was a huge success (Nexy designed and Tibhar labeled it with Tibhar logo). It showed what Nexy wanted to achieve. Peterpan also revealed Nexy’s ideal blade concept for the Third Generation (attacking with bang impact, but with a milder dual speed system).

From this Third Generation blade concept, Nexy could more accurately describe the intention of the next generation blades by using the terms such as Point, Line, and Plane, which were discovered through a great deal of research, experimentation, and development. If you search the early articles I wrote when I began Nexy, you can find three major surface woods that I studied for many years. I will connect the wood materials in order to help you understand what Nexy wants to describe Line, Plane, and Point. So, those three factors are more or less related to the surface wood and feeling of the touch.

Hinoki is the perfect representative material to illustrate the concept of “line” factor. It grips the ball shallowly on the surface, and drives it long. So, the ball seems to be sticking onto the surface, and the wood seems to draw a line with the ball as the swing movement cuts through the air.

Limba is the major material for Stiga’s traditional blade design concept, and it has an excellent “plane” character. Limba embraces the ball with the entire blade, and players will feel as if the whole layer is instantly hugging the ball until it bounces off. This is what Nexy refers to as “plane.”

Ayous shows what Nexy means by “point.” Ayous takes in the ball on one small and sharp point, and the impact does not overflow over that pointed area. But on the other side of the point, the wood seems to be supporting the impacted area with a great deal of power and strength. Players using an ayous wooden surface can feel an enlarged point (according to the second layer’s character) that meets the ball with greater power.

I did not begin using these concepts with the Fourth Generation blades. I had been identifying them since the beginning of the First Generation, but I was not sure how to categorize them into my blade descriptions. I could more clearly classify those factors into the Fourth Generation, because these blades required a clearer concept for those terms, i.e., Line, Plane, and Point.
We are now using the poly ball, which is larger and heavier. The material produces a softer sound and has greater elasticity than celluloid balls, so players will naturally feel that it weighs more. Therefore, many players complained that they lost spin when switching to the new ball. This had become one of the major factors Nexy considered for the Fourth Generation blades. As a result, I began designing the new Nexy series of blades by searching for unique wooden materials that have a good “line factor.” In result, the Fourth Generation had provided players with series of new surface woods that could drive the ball longer. So, Chedech was constructed with Wenge wood, which is widely known for its excellent “line” character. And Zealot followed this with the newly introduced African wood.
I also needed to enhance the overall speed of the blades. I cannot say whether or not Qabod (2nd) and Arirang, Inca (3rd) are slower than Zealot; yet, I tried to make a speedier blade overall. If players test Nexy’s Fourth Generation blades with the old celluloid balls, they might find them a little difficult to control because they are very fast. However, if players try the Fourth Generation blades with poly balls, they will find them to be an excellent offensive weapon for an attacking game, with a balanced speed.

One final note: Those two factors are related to concept of “point.” If a Nexy blade does not have a point feeling (meeting the ball with one point or a little bit bigger dot gripping the ball and supporting its impact with that small area), then it cannot drive the ball long (line) and it cannot make longer, more powerful shots. Strong impact is not about how quickly the blade bounces off the ball. Rather it is more related to the duration of time that the blade keeps the ball on itself for a longer moment than other blades.


Zealot: The ideal Fourth Generation Blade

When I consider all of the factors listed above, Zealot matches the ideal concept of Nexy’s Fourth Generation blades. The surface wood grips the ball with a “dot” (point), and it drives the ball longer than other blades (line). Additionally, when we check the thickness and the weight of the blade, this blade is relatively thin and very fast.
What’s amazing and peculiar about Zealot is that when players become accustomed to it, they cannot turn (or return) to other blades so easily. Zealot’s unique characteristics cause players to become addicted to playing with it. I can say this with absolute confidence because of my personal experience. I became consumed by Zealot and lost the ability to objectively test other blades. It was very difficult for me to identify the good qualities of Olam and Z-blade. So, they were in danger of being lost in my memory because Zealot included the desirable features of all the other blades combined. It’s really quite exceptional. It’s attractive and easy for players like myself to become lost in its charm and performance.

However, I am not saying that Zealot is the absolute best Fourth Generation blade. The other blades in the series show different features and qualities, and can more easily be compared to other brands blades. But Zealot is extremely unique and seductive. Therefore, I issue a friendly warning to players who try Zealot — BEWARE! You could be consumed by Zealot and never return to other blades.
In conclusion, this is the representative Nexy’s Fourth Generation blade, and you may very well become addicted to it.

Official Introduction of Olam

I will not repeat the description of Nexy’s Fourth Generation. For more information, please refer to the previously written introduction for Zealot. This will help you view this blade with the basic understanding of the entire series of blades.

Olam is adopting a new surface material. This is something Nexy had never done in previous generations.
Olam is quite the opposite of Zealot in several ways. Zealot has a strong “line” factor with a slightly sticky feeling. Olam feels more creamy than sticky. It’s slightly buttery, like a delicious cream that stays on your tongue just long enough to savor. It's definitely gripping the ball, but not grabbing it like Hinoki (Kanaph) or Wenge (Chedech). We can call it bouncy, but typically a ball does not remain on a bouncy blade long enough to create the needed spin.

However, even though Olam does not grip the ball for very long, it absorbs the ball deep enough in that short moment to repels it with great power. Olam does not grip the ball like Zealot, nor does it drive the ball long like Zealot. Players may not feel the ball for very long, but they will notice a good amount of spin. For this reason, I strongly recommend Olam for those who play close to the table with a sharp and quick swing movement. They would enjoy quality spin even with their short, compact stroke.

Olam is very attractive to Asian players, but I am not sure it's suitable for the European market. European players prefer to play a little bit away from the table with big swing movement, while Asian players tend to play close to the table. For example, Korean players have a strong and quick swing, and they expect to enjoy the fully charged spin with their short, fast swing. Therefore, if a blade has a good spin in a quick moment, then it could be a good fit for close to the table players.

Due to its uniqueness (quick and short response), I could not immediately identify the good qualities of Olam. Actually, I began testing Zealot, Olam, and Z-blade at the same time, but I quickly became addicted to Zealot, and I had trouble being objective when demoing the other two. As a result, Z-blade was sentenced to be forgotten from my blade history, and it could be revived only by the many Korean testers, who have requested it continuously over the past years. Olam took almost a year for me to realize that it has its own unique performance characteristics.

All three blades are brothers, and they share a similar size and shape, but I think they are uniquely different from each other. So, it will take a long time to understand the differences and similarities between them.
I strongly recommend that players who are fully satisfied with Zealot to stick with Zealot! They should not buy Olam because it will surely look and feel unattractive by comparison. However, I can safely recommend Olam for players who pride themselves on having a quick, compact swing movement and want to make the most of their stroke.


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PostPosted: 06 Jul 2016, 11:40 
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2016 Nexy’s New J-Pens


In 2016, Nexy opened the doors and revealed three J-Pen brothers.
Nexy does not continuously sell Hinoki one-ply blades. Top quality Japanese Kiso Hinoki woods are not easy to obtain, and the raw materials are becoming rarer year after year.

So, our production of these blades has been dependent upon the availability of raw material on the market. It was a lucky year! After a long wait, we were finally able to acquire enough precious Hinoki to create three J-Pen brothers:



Temujin +

It’s been 10-years since Nexy sold the AA-grade Hannibal J-Pen in the market. When Nexy begun, its main focus was to compete with other brands (which has now turned into making its own path), and to acquire good raw materials was quite an attractive task.

But we could make only 20 blades, which were quickly sold out. Temujin was one of our original J-Pen designed, and it is now reborn under a new name, “Temujin +.”

Meet the finest selection of Nexy. The wood is cut from the inside of an old Japanese Hinoki tree trunks. It is 11mm thick, which are seldom seen in the table tennis market. It has a soft touch, but with a speedy character. The reason why? We wanted to make this blade the most powerful, fastest J-Pen ever.


Still, the price is quite competitive. In the future, it might be next to impossible to find AA-Grade Hinoki that is suitable for 11mm one-ply blades.

There’s a good chance that this blade will be a one-time production; therefore, we made the price a little lower than the market standard. Maybe this sounds strange to your ears, but I believe it proves that Nexy tries to be fair and responsible to the needs of our customers.
These blades will not stay long in Nexy’s warehouse.

If you want one of these pure Hinoki beauties, we highly recommend that you hurry-up and grab one!

http://nexyttstore.com/japanese-penhold/493-temujin-plus.html




Iskandar +

Iskandar is another excellent Nexy blade that has been missing for a decade. It was well regarded and commonly known as a trustworthy J-Pen, but unfortunately we could not continue to produce this blade due to the lack of available raw Hinoki.

However, after a long absence, Iskandar has returned to Nexy’s product list under a new name, “Iskandar +.”

This is made of A-grade Japanese Kiso Hinoki — a fine wood with good quality. It is 10.5mm thick. It’s commonly known that Korean players prefer to have a fast blade, and Korea is the only place that players can buy a J-Pen that is thicker than 9mm.

Normally, Japanese brands specifically produce top quality J-Pen blades for the Korean market with a 10mm thickness. Some Korean brands try to make them thicker, and only a few brands have J-Pens thicker than 10mm. Nexy is one of those brands!

Iskandar + is a beautiful and powerful J-Pen created from hand-picked A-grade wood. It’s a shame that Nexy cannot guarantee to continuously produce this blade.

However, at the moment, you can lay your hands on this beauty, but you'd better hurry. The materials are getting rarer by the day. Now is your chance to experience the exceptional feel and performance of Iskandar +.

http://nexyttstore.com/japanese-penhold/494-iskandar-plus-.html




Caritas +

Throughout the years, Caritas has been Nexy’s representative Hinoki J-Pen. Along the way, Nexy has been able to acquire some "A-" grade Hinoki wood, and each time, this blade was shown to players.

Nexy will once again release Caritas, but this time under a new name, Caritas +. Like Iskandar +, this blade is also made from hand-selected "A-" grade Japanese Hinoki wood.

I cannot say this blade is better than Iskandar +. But we can consider the price gap when we compare them as both have their own special characteristics.

Caritas + is a highly attractive and compatible blade due to its surprisingly low price. A 10mm J-Pen with one-ply Japanese Hinoki wood is a rare find nowadays. Therefore, this blade is a real blessing, given the circumstances.

Japanese Hinoki trees are now getting rarer and rarer, and sooner or later this grade wood will disappear. So, if you are a J-Pen player, then now is the time to buy a lovely Hinoki J-Pen at a good price.
That’s why we call this blade “Caritas.” It’s new stylish design allows us to add a “+” onto the name.
Take advantage of this amazing opportunity!

http://nexyttstore.com/japanese-penhold/495-caritas-plus.html


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PostPosted: 06 Jul 2016, 11:45 
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Official Introduction of Olam


I will not repeat the description of Nexy’s Fourth Generation. For more information, please refer to the previously written introduction for Zealot. This will help you view this blade with the basic understanding of the entire series of blades.


Olam is adopting a new surface material. This is something Nexy had never done in previous generations.
Olam is quite the opposite of Zealot in several ways. Zealot has a strong “line” factor with a slightly sticky feeling. Olam feels more creamy than sticky. It’s slightly buttery, like a delicious cream that stays on your tongue just long enough to savor. It's definitely gripping the ball, but not grabbing it like Hinoki (Kanaph) or Wenge (Chedech).


We can call it bouncy, but typically a ball does not remain on a bouncy blade long enough to create the needed spin. However, even though Olam does not grip the ball for very long, it absorbs the ball deep enough in that short moment to repels it with great power. Olam does not grip the ball like Zealot, nor does it drive the ball long like Zealot.

Players may not feel the ball for very long, but they will notice a good amount of spin. For this reason, I strongly recommend Olam for those who play close to the table with a sharp and quick swing movement. They would enjoy quality spin even with their short, compact stroke.



Olam is very attractive to Asian players, but I am not sure it's suitable for the European market. European players prefer to play a little bit away from the table with big swing movement, while Asian players tend to play close to the table. For example, Korean players have a strong and quick swing, and they expect to enjoy the fully charged spin with their short, fast swing. Therefore, if a blade has a good spin in a quick moment, then it could be a good fit for close to the table players.

Due to its uniqueness (quick and short response), I could not immediately identify the good qualities of Olam. Actually, I began testing Zealot, Olam, and Z-blade at the same time, but I quickly became addicted to Zealot, and I had trouble being objective when demoing the other two. As a result, Z-blade was sentenced to be forgotten from my blade history, and it could be revived only by the many Korean testers, who have requested it continuously over the past years. Olam took almost a year for me to realize that it has its own unique performance characteristics.

http://nexyttstore.com/shakehand/463-olam.html?search_query=olam&results=1


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PostPosted: 06 Jul 2016, 11:46 
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Official Introduction of Zealot



It’s been quite some time since Nexy launched Zealot. As a designer, I feel obliged to write an official English introduction for each blade, but until now I could not find the time to do this for Zealot. Please forgive me. I’ve been extremely busy and a bit lazy. Of course, I wrote many pages of articles about how I came up with the basic idea for this blade’s design concept in the Korean language, but writing an English article has been delayed until now. But I think "better late than never." I am writing this English article to provide supportive information to whoever wants to better understand the major features of Zealot.

Zealot has been in production for over a year, and I can now see more clearly its good aspects. Therefore, this explanation will be based on a wider range of market feedback from Korean purchasers, and I believe that this article will be helpful for all the players interested in Zealot outside of Korea.



<Summary of Nexy’s Fourth Generation Blades>

Let me begin with a brief summary of Nexy’s Fourth Generation blades. Nexy started the Fourth Generation by releasing Kanaph (3.5th Gen.), followed by Chedech (4th). It’s not easy to provide one clear image of the Fourth Generation because Nexy did not focus on one specific feature as we did with the Third Generation, which paid particular attention to the “bang impact.”

All Third Generation blades shared that general feature and function, and the sizes were also fairly uniform. Nexy experimented with many different types of blades throughout the First and Second Generations. This helped us determine the focus for the Third Generation. Therefore, players were sure to find similar features throughout the various blades of that series.



The Third Generation blades focused on the following factors:

1. Deep touch: I tried to deepen the feeling of impact inside the blade. That meant players could have a “bang impact” during exertion of a full swing movement.

2. Attacking size & weight balance: Most Third Generation blades aimed at a fast and powerful looping ability. In order to optimize this feature, I designed most of the blades with a similar size (157x150) and thickness (5.7mm~6.0mm). You might be thinking that I was trying to widen the material choices based on one blade shape.

3. Milder dual speed: In the Second Generation, I aimed at maximizing the range of the “dual speed” system for many blades. Lissom, with a large speed gap between the speed of attacking and blocking, could be acknowledged as a good weapon for players who want to accomplish steady and stable looping from all positions. Calix is a thin attacking blade with very good touch and an extreme dual speed system. It’s still fast, considering its 4.9mm thickness.

With Calix 2 and Qabod, players could feel the adjusted dual speed. These blades are very powerful and versatile for continuous and oppressing attacking style, which connected Nexy’s Second and Third Generations.



Nexy can safely summarize the goal for the Third Generation as such: Featured a dual speed system that was not too shallow nor too deep in order to avoid being too exotic for players. The Kim Jung Hoon blade is a good example of the milder version dual speed system, which was a huge success (Nexy designed and Tibhar labeled it with Tibhar logo). It showed what Nexy wanted to achieve. Peterpan also revealed Nexy’s ideal blade concept for the Third Generation (attacking with bang impact, but with a milder dual speed system).

From this Third Generation blade concept, Nexy could more accurately describe the intention of the next generation blades by using the terms such as Point, Line, and Plane, which were discovered through a great deal of research, experimentation, and development. If you search the early articles I wrote when I began Nexy, you can find three major surface woods that I studied for many years. I will connect the wood materials in order to help you understand what Nexy wants to describe Line, Plane, and Point. So, those three factors are more or less related to the surface wood and feeling of the touch.



Hinoki is the perfect representative material to illustrate the concept of “line” factor. It grips the ball shallowly on the surface, and drives it long. So, the ball seems to be sticking onto the surface, and the wood seems to draw a line with the ball as the swing movement cuts through the air.

Limba is the major material for Stiga’s traditional blade design concept, and it has an excellent “plane” character. Limba embraces the ball with the entire blade, and players will feel as if the whole layer is instantly hugging the ball until it bounces off. This is what Nexy refers to as “plane.”

Ayous shows what Nexy means by “point.” Ayous takes in the ball on one small and sharp point, and the impact does not overflow over that pointed area. But on the other side of the point, the wood seems to be supporting the impacted area with a great deal of power and strength. Players using an ayous wooden surface can feel an enlarged point (according to the second layer’s character) that meets the ball with greater power.


I did not begin using these concepts with the Fourth Generation blades. I had been identifying them since the beginning of the First Generation, but I was not sure how to categorize them into my blade descriptions. I could more clearly classify those factors into the Fourth Generation, because these blades required a clearer concept for those terms, i.e., Line, Plane, and Point.

We are now using the poly ball, which is larger and heavier. The material produces a softer sound and has greater elasticity than celluloid balls, so players will naturally feel that it weighs more. Therefore, many players complained that they lost spin when switching to the new ball.

This had become one of the major factors Nexy considered for the Fourth Generation blades. As a result, I began designing the new Nexy series of blades by searching for unique wooden materials that have a good “line factor.” In result, the Fourth Generation had provided players with series of new surface woods that could drive the ball longer. So, Chedech was constructed with Wenge wood, which is widely known for its excellent “line” character. And Zealot followed this with the newly introduced African wood.


I also needed to enhance the overall speed of the blades. I cannot say whether or not Qabod (2nd) and Arirang, Inca (3rd) are slower than Zealot; yet, I tried to make a speedier blade overall. If players test Nexy’s Fourth Generation blades with the old celluloid balls, they might find them a little difficult to control because they are very fast. However, if players try the Fourth Generation blades with poly balls, they will find them to be an excellent offensive weapon for an attacking game, with a balanced speed.


One final note: Those two factors are related to concept of “point.” If a Nexy blade does not have a point feeling (meeting the ball with one point or a little bit bigger dot gripping the ball and supporting its impact with that small area), then it cannot drive the ball long (line) and it cannot make longer, more powerful shots. Strong impact is not about how quickly the blade bounces off the ball. Rather it is more related to the duration of time that the blade keeps the ball on itself for a longer moment than other blades.



Zealot: The ideal Fourth Generation Blade

When I consider all of the factors listed above, Zealot matches the ideal concept of Nexy’s Fourth Generation blades. The surface wood grips the ball with a “dot” (point), and it drives the ball longer than other blades (line). Additionally, when we check the thickness and the weight of the blade, this blade is relatively thin and very fast.
What’s amazing and peculiar about Zealot is that when players become accustomed to it, they cannot turn (or return) to other blades so easily.

Zealot’s unique characteristics cause players to become addicted to playing with it. I can say this with absolute confidence because of my personal experience. I became consumed by Zealot and lost the ability to objectively test other blades. It was very difficult for me to identify the good qualities of Olam and Z-blade. So, they were in danger of being lost in my memory because Zealot included the desirable features of all the other blades combined. It’s really quite exceptional. It’s attractive and easy for players like myself to become lost in its charm and performance.


However, I am not saying that Zealot is the absolute best Fourth Generation blade. The other blades in the series show different features and qualities, and can more easily be compared to other brands blades. But Zealot is extremely unique and seductive. Therefore, I issue a friendly warning to players who try Zealot — BEWARE! You could be consumed by Zealot and never return to other blades.
In conclusion, this is the representative Nexy’s Fourth Generation blade, and you may very well become addicted to it.


http://nexyttstore.com/shakehand/455-zealot.html?search_query=zealot&results=4


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