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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2012, 03:25 
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In response to my questions for Joo Sehyuk, carbonman wrote "birding, the 1975 Worlds was very famous. Amongst other things it inspired a whole generation to try to play like Jonyer. Also, it was pretty much saw the birth of LP on the world stage when Lu Yuan Sheng used it to defeat Surbek. I would love to read some of your impressions of the event if you would like to relate them. cheers."

I thought that it would probably best if I answered this question by starting a new thread.

Carbonman, thanks for your questions, which bring back lots of great memories. I still have a copy of the program from the 1975 World Championships in Calcutta, India, so I looked up the scores of many matches to refresh my memory. (I should mention that this was the only world championships that I competed in. I was 18 years old, and a member of the Canadian men's team. My table tennis career came to an end a few months after the world champoinships due to a serious back injury.)

My description is a lot longer than I had intended. I took my daughter to her violin lesson, and had no internet access during her 45-minute lesson, so I spent that time writing this description about my world champtionship memories. I hope that a few people find this to be interesting, and that the length isn't too extreme. (I got sort of carried away with all of my good memories.)

With regard to Istvan Jonyer's winning the men' singles, I remember his first round match (round of 128) with Ingemar Wikstroem from Sweden. (Being a participant in the World Championships, I was able to watch all matches except for the team event final from the floor.) At one point in the match, Wikstroem was winning 18-14 in the 5th game. To me, Jonyer looked as if he had given up. He was looking all round, and didn't seem to be focused on the match. I was certain that this was about to be the first big upset of the tournament. Of course, I couldn't be more wrong, as Jonyer won the next 7 points to win the match. In the second round, Jonyer played Jaroslav Kunz of Czechoslovakia. Kunz won the first two games rather easily. I then left to watch another match. I don't recall if I left the Jonyer/Kunz match because it looked to be a foregone conclusion that Kunz would win, or because I had to watch a teammate play. (All members of the Canadian team were required to watch all of each other's matches, even if a big match was taking place elsewhere.) I later heard that Jonyer had come back to win the next 3 games. In the 3rd round, Jonyer played Errol Caetano, one of my teammates. Normally I would have thought that Errol would have had no chance against Jonyer, but given that Jonyer had struggled through the first two rounds, I thought that Errol might have had a chance. However, it didn't work out that way, as Jonyer won 3-0. In the 4th round, Jonyer had an easy win over Li Peng, one of the lesser known players on the Chinese team, placing Jonyer in the quarter finals. Since only one member of the Chinese team made the quarter finals in the men's singles (Hsi En-ting), many people, including myself, were wondering whether the Chinese players were losing their matches intentionally. In his quarter final match, Jonyer beat Sarkhayan of the Soviet Union in a close 3-1 match. The semi-final between Jonyer and Kohno of Japan was rather boring, as Jonyer won that match in three easy games. Prior to that match, the coach of the Canadian team, Zlatko Cordas, told me that Jonyer's record against Kohno was something like 10 wins and 0 losses. So, I was expecting a lobsided match. The final between Jonyer and Stipancic was very exciting. Jonyer was down 2 games to 0, and came back to win the next 3 games. I'll never forget the last point of the match, since it ended with Stipancic chopping and Jonyer looping. Stipancic could do everything, including chopping, very well, but that is certainly not what he would have wanted when down 20-19 in the 5th game of the world championship final!

One special memory for me in the men's singles was seeing Norio Takashima reach the semi-final, where he lost to Stipancic 3 games to 2. For those not familiar, Takashima was amongst the best defensive players of all time. Even though I played with anti-spin on my backhand, and Takashima used inverted rubber on his backhand, I tried to model my game as best as I could after Takashima. He was an incredible player. I got to watch Takashima in several different tournaments, taking many pages of notes each time. I also had some very nice conversations with Takashima too.

Although you didn't ask me about the women's singles, I have some interesting memories of Kim Yung-Sun's win. Kim Yung-Sun was from North Korea. (Tragically, she passed away when she was about 30 years old.) Kim
played Jill Hammersly in the first found. Our team was traveling with the English team, so we often supported each other in our matches. Jill had the entire Canadian and English team cheering her on. Kim seemed to have
no one supporting her. I had the impression that there were no other North Korean coaches or players present. Anyway, Kim won a very close 3-2 match. Kim's route to the round of 16 was straightforward, after which she won another close 3-2 match against Lotaller of Hungary. In the quarter finals, Kim beat my favourite women's player, Chung Hyun-sook of South Korea, an incredible defensive player, who together with Lee Ailesa had won the 1973 World Team Championship, an accomplishment that is still well remembered in South Korea today. This match was another close 3-2 win for Kim. In the semi-finals, Kim won her fourth 3-2 match against Ferdmans of the Soviet Union. I remember cheering for Kim. The finals was, unfortunately, perhaps the most disappointing match I have ever seen. I think that it was obvious to almost everyone present that Chang Li was ordered to lose to Kim. As a result, the finals was a boring, lopsided meaningless match.

Perhaps the most interesting aspect of these world championships for me was seeing Chinese defensive players using lonp pips. I had never seen long pips before, and I don't really know if this was the first
world championships in which long pips was used. On the men's team, Lu Yuan-sheng used long pips, as I think did Liang Ko-liang. There was also a women on the Chinese team that used long pips, but I don't recall her name. At the time, because of its effectiveness, I had wondered whether long pips would completely change table tennis, somewhat in analogy to the introduction of sponge rubber by Satoh in the 1952 World Championships. As I mentioned, I stopped playing competitively a few months after the world championships, and didn't resume playing until about one year ago. Upon returning to the game I could see that long pips, although popular, didn't revolutionize table tennis as I had wondered might happen. The most memorable long pips match was between Lu Yuan-sheng and Dragutin Surbek in the men's team finals. Surbek was totally confused by Lu throughout the match. Surbek didn't know what to do with the longs pips, and he seemed to be unable to distinguish the inverted rubber from the long pips. (In those days, the colour of both sides of the racket could be the same.) As a result, the match was lopsided. For me, it was exciting to see a defensive player beat Surbek, as I regarded Surbek as the best player in the world against defense. I thought he was unbeatable for a defensive player. However, as the match progressed my excitement diminished. The match was too lopsided. There were few longs points, it was mostly Surbek missing everything. Many of Surbeks loops landed on his side of the table, well short of the net. To compare this to modern-day table tennis, it would be as if an unknown chopper beat Wang Hao at a score like 11-2, 11-3, 11-1, with the majority of Wang's loops being missed. Lu's beating Surbek so badly made me feel that Lu's equipment was the key factor, not his exceptional defensive skills.

For anyone that is interested in how I did in the world championships, in the team competition, as I recall, I think that I lost more matches that I won, in the men's singles I lost in the 3rd preliminary round to Dal-joon Lee of the US, and in the men's doubles I was disqualified. With regard to the men's doubles, my partner was Joseph Azulay from Israel. Joseph could not attend the world championships, along with all of his teammates, since India refused to grant visas to the Israeli table tennis team. This was unfortunate. In the men's doubles, we had a very easy draw to the round of 32, as we would have had to beat teams from countries such as Mauritius, North Yemen and Brazil. In the round of 32, we would have played a team from Poland, which I think we would have had an excellent chance to win. That would have put us into the round of 16 against Istvan Jonyer and Gabor Gergeley, the eventual world champions. Even though we would have certainly lost, it would have been a
very exciting and memorable opportunity to have played against them.

I do have one question for anyone that has read this far. Was the 1975 World Championship indeed the first international competition in which long pips were introduced? It would be exciting to know that I saw such an historic table tennis competition. Also, since I now use long pips, this would be for me personally quite interesting.

Steven

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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2012, 04:48 
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Absolute peach of a post. Amazing read! I wish India gets to host another major tournament though...

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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2012, 07:05 
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Birding, that was a great read. Really enjoyed it. :up: :up: :up: :up: :up:

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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2012, 08:10 
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Many thanks, a great read :up:
a cut and paste from the NZTT website

Boisterous and Eventful World Champs

New Zealand was represented at the 33rd World Championships by the same players who played the teams events at the Commonwealths: Richard Lee (captain), James Morris, Gary Murphy, Robert Blair, Anne Stonestreet, Yvonne Fogarty and Kathy Fraser. Calcutta, India, was the host city and their opening ceremony, embellished by the throb of fourteen brass bands and five drum and cymbal groups, was a colourful spectacle. More than 50 nations marched past, some in bright national costume. And once play started the enthusiastic Indian crowds in the 12,000 seat stadium would leap to their feet in appreciation after any spectacular rally or exciting match.

It was India’s first World Championships since Bombay hosted in 1952. The Bombay event was the first in Asia.

On purely political grounds the Indian government excluded South Africa and Israel from the Championships – a controversial move which resulted in a censure from the ITTF, particularly in the light of the admission of Palestine (unrecognised by the UN) as a nation.

Although China won both team events the individual titles, surprisingly, were largely dominated by players from Europe. Istvan Jonyer won the men’s singles and combined with Hungarian team-mate Gabor Gergely to also win the doubles. The women’s doubles ended in somewhat bizarre fashion with Romanian and Japanese players who could not speak each other’s languages combining (and presumably communicating) well enough to beat a Chinese pair in the final. The Soviet Union won the mixed doubles. In the women’s singles the early exit of top seed Hu Yu-Lan (China) left her compatriot, 2nd seeded Chang Li, an obvious favourite. But Chang was unexpectedly beaten in the final by a virtually unknown (and unseeded) 18 year old schoolgirl, Yun Sun Kim of North Korea. As a world final the match was a disappointment, not helped by both players being left-handed. New Zealand champion and team captain Richard Lee, by now a prolific contributor of articles to the NZ Herald, offered the alternate theory that the Korean win may have been a gesture by China to maintain friendly international relations.
The New Zealand men’s team finished 34th out of 48 teams. It was an improvement on their 38th place in 1971 and 1973 but disappointing in that a win in their last contest over Luxembourg would have elevated them to at least 33rd but they lost 2-5. On the other hand, they had a very exciting win over South Vietnam with Gary Murphy coming from 18-20 down in the marathon first game against Tri Trieu to win 32-30, 17-21, 21-19 and Richard Lee beating the same player 20-22, 24-22, 21-17. NZ won 5-3. They also had 5-0 wins over Sri Lanka and Macao and a close 4-5 loss to Egypt.

The women dropped to 27th out of 36, four places down from their 1973 placing. They beat Brazil twice and had good wins over Canada and Greece. They lost to Luxembourg, Switzerland, Malaysia and Australia.

In the individual events only James Morris and Richard Lee proceeded beyond the qualifying rounds.

Trevor Flint had been team coach at the Commonwealths, traveling at his own expense. He did not go on to Calcutta and his input was missed.

Attending the Championships as newly-elected ITTF Vice-President (Oceania) was New Zealander Ken Wilkinson. He was astounded by the attention lavished on him in his unfamiliar role. He had the services of a full-time secretary, a chauffeur-driven car and 24 hour security provided by two body-guards on rotating shifts. “As far as I’m concerned this was unprecedented VIP treatment,” said Ken. “I don’t know why they went to such lengths.”

A moment of unexpected drama occurred during the singles semi-finals – a torrential downpour leaked through the roof and deposited large drops of water on the tables, causing a 75 minute suspension in play. “We had not had the time to test the roof to find out of it was leak-proof,” said an embarrassed West Bengal Government official. “But who had expected it to rain so heavily at this time of the year!” The 12,000 seat stadium had been erected in just four months and completed a mere ten days before the event.

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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2012, 08:33 
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Nice post.

A couple of things-the Chinese woman using LP was probably Ge Xinai (Ke Hsian-Ai), who went on to become World Champion in 1979.

Also there was a notable occurence during the MS semi between Takashima and Stipancic-Rain stopped play! the roof began to leak and play had to be suspended for a while.

Tim Boggan says in his History of US TT that the Jonyer-Stipancic Final was the worst he ever saw, both players nervous and prone to error, particularly Jonyer at the start.
Poor Stipancic lost the Singles final, the Doubles Final and the Team final at Calcutta...

I would love to see some video footage of the Calcutta Worlds-all I've ever seen is some of the team Finals and one rally from the MD Final. There must be more out there somewhere.


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2012, 08:34 
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Fantastic post thanks birding! - a great read. I was 13/14 in 1975 and had just started playing seriously. My first knowledge of top players was from scratchy super 8's from Calcutta and from the stories bought home from those who were there so that event holds some magic for me. I remember being amazed and inspired when one guy told me: "When Jonyer gets his big loops on you have a better chance of returning them from the next court!".

I didn't know Pak Yung-Sun (Kim Yung-Sun) died so young. I remember everyone commenting that Chang Li had to chuck to her in the final. You probably know this but Chang Li ended up marrying Li Chenshi and I think they now coach in the US somewhere (East coast I think).

Takashima was indeed an incredible player. So technically perfect and almost never made an unforced error - every chop landed on the back white-line! Furakawa was also a very good Japanese chopper around that time and visited Australia several times.

I remember seeing footage of Kohno beating Surbek in the 1/4ers. He would do those BH fast serves extremely wide to Surbek's BH, Surbek would run around then Kohno would smash the crap out of the next ball down Surbek's FH! Sadly for Kohno those tactics didn't work against Jonyer in the semis as Jonyer had such a great BH loop.

I'm guessing Calcutta was the first time long-pips came to prominence at a World champs. I think Liang GeLiang used medium pips before that but I think LP and the concept of twiddling really caught on when Lu Yuan Sheng beat Surbek. That was a really bizarre match as Lu looked to be a very average chopper (Stipancic - who was a great reader of spin - whooped him) and Surbek was probably a 5 times better player. I had heard that when Surbek/Stipancic played doubles against same colour LP players Stipancic used to call out the spin to Surbek!

Were you in Melbourne for the 1975 Commonwealth champs? I assume you were and if so I would have seen you play. However whilst I remember Caetano and Domonkos I don't recall a Canadian chopper...but Im sure you were very good! Do you remember Bajaj from India? What an enigma! - SP's both sides, no real technique but talented as hell and could smash anything.


Last edited by carbonman on 29 Nov 2012, 07:24, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2012, 08:57 
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carbonman wrote:

I didn't know Pak Yung-Sun (Kim Yung-Sun) died so young. I remember everyone commenting that Chang Li had to chuck to her in the final. You probably know this but Chang Li ended up marrying Li Chenshi and I think they now coach in the US somewhere (East coast I think).



Zhang Li and Li Zhen Shi are now head coaches at World Champions Academy in San Francisco area, one of the 22 ITTF designated "Hot Spots" training facilities in the world:

http://www.butterflyonline.com/WCTTA/


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2012, 09:39 
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Thanks for the brilliant post, birding! I was born later that year in 1975 but your post makes this world championship so much alive that I still have the feeling to remember some flashes :lol:

Found some WTTC1975 material to make your story even more vivid. First Chinese player in the vid is Lu Yuansheng with long pips



And a short fragment from a friendly match with Lu Yuansheng against a Dutch player in 1977


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PostPosted: 28 Nov 2012, 10:47 
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Fabulous post and definitely not too long! Thanks Steven.

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PostPosted: 29 Nov 2012, 01:16 
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birding&table.tennis wrote:
I do have one question for anyone that has read this far. Was the 1975 World Championship indeed the first international competition in which long pips were introduced? It would be exciting to know that I saw such an historic table tennis competition. Also, since I now use long pips, this would be for me personally quite interesting.
Steven


Did some quick research: first long pips user was Zhang Xi Lin of China in the early sixties! He was born in 1940 and is reported as one of the earliest successful long-pimple rubber players, and the first Chinese player to win a men's double champion (with Wang Zhiliang, on 1963 world table tennis championship)

In the video below you can see Zhang Xi Lin [aka Chang Shih-lin] (China) vs Hiroshi Takahashi (Japan) in the men's team final, 1965 World Table Tennis Championship, Ljubljana, Yugoslavia. China beats Japan 5-2.



I also found that it was in 1971 that Jean-Paul Weber of France uses the first anti-spin rubber in the World Championships in Nagoya, Japan.

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PostPosted: 30 Nov 2012, 17:27 
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Simply amazing, Sir!
To the archive!

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PostPosted: 01 Dec 2012, 03:11 
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I'd like to thank everyone for their positive comments on my description of my memories of the 1975 World Championships. Many of those comments bring back other wonderful memories. I never before written an article about table tennis before, other than a dry article 40 years ago article about the Canadian table tennis rating system, so I was a little nervous about how such a long description would be received.

I plan to respond to those comments in about 1 1/2 weeks. I am attending an atmospheric science conference in San Francisco next week, and won't have time to respond to those comments until after I get back. Of course, I hope that my conference won't be all work, and that I will have some time for table tennis.

One thing that has amazed me about the OOAK table tennis forum is the tremendous knowledge amongst its members about table tennis equipment. When I was 15 years old, I purchased my blade from Bob Brickell based on his recommendation (I don't know what type of blade it was, but presumably it is similar to a Hock blade), Yasaka Mark V for the forehand (I don't recall why I chose that rubber, but in those days the choices were rather limited), and Jooa Tonihold AntiTopspin, because of the success of Jean Paul Weber in the 1971 World Championships. After that purchase, I never talked to anyone about equipment. So, when I first started to read discussions about table tennis rackets on the OOAK form, I stunned, because I had mistakenly thought that I knew a lot about table tennis equipment, yet in fact I was completely clueless. Of course, it has been fascinating to learn so much from the OOAK forum.

Thanks again for all of your comments,

Steven

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PostPosted: 01 Dec 2012, 03:54 
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Hi Steven,
Bob Brickell was a good friend of mine.
I started with a 1/2" thick sponge bat, saved for a hock and a couple years later went to inverted. Then Seemiller grip with anti on the back. Still play that way.
Last time I saw Bob was about 6 years ago. He still had his table tennis supply shop. Dont know if he still does. He had his own line of bats, SUPER FAST. When I grew up, the U.S. Nats, the Eastern Open, most of the big tourneys were in N.Y., Penn or Ohio. I went to all of them. Things have changed alot since then.
Good to have you on the forum.
West :)

I checked his old site and it does not come up anymore. ;(


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PostPosted: 08 Feb 2013, 11:08 
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rodderz wrote:
Many thanks, a great read :up:
a cut and paste from the NZTT website

Boisterous and Eventful World Champs

New Zealand was represented at the 33rd World Championships by the same players who played the teams events at the Commonwealths: Richard Lee (captain), James Morris, Gary Murphy, Robert Blair, Anne Stonestreet, Yvonne Fogarty and Kathy Fraser. Calcutta, India, was the host city and their opening ceremony, embellished by the throb of fourteen brass bands and five drum and cymbal groups, was a colourful spectacle. More than 50 nations marched past, some in bright national costume. And once play started the enthusiastic Indian crowds in the 12,000 seat stadium would leap to their feet in appreciation after any spectacular rally or exciting match.

It was India’s first World Championships since Bombay hosted in 1952. The Bombay event was the first in Asia.

On purely political grounds the Indian government excluded South Africa and Israel from the Championships – a controversial move which resulted in a censure from the ITTF, particularly in the light of the admission of Palestine (unrecognised by the UN) as a nation.

Although China won both team events the individual titles, surprisingly, were largely dominated by players from Europe. Istvan Jonyer won the men’s singles and combined with Hungarian team-mate Gabor Gergely to also win the doubles. The women’s doubles ended in somewhat bizarre fashion with Romanian and Japanese players who could not speak each other’s languages combining (and presumably communicating) well enough to beat a Chinese pair in the final. The Soviet Union won the mixed doubles. In the women’s singles the early exit of top seed Hu Yu-Lan (China) left her compatriot, 2nd seeded Chang Li, an obvious favourite. But Chang was unexpectedly beaten in the final by a virtually unknown (and unseeded) 18 year old schoolgirl, Yun Sun Kim of North Korea. As a world final the match was a disappointment, not helped by both players being left-handed. New Zealand champion and team captain Richard Lee, by now a prolific contributor of articles to the NZ Herald, offered the alternate theory that the Korean win may have been a gesture by China to maintain friendly international relations.
The New Zealand men’s team finished 34th out of 48 teams. It was an improvement on their 38th place in 1971 and 1973 but disappointing in that a win in their last contest over Luxembourg would have elevated them to at least 33rd but they lost 2-5. On the other hand, they had a very exciting win over South Vietnam with Gary Murphy coming from 18-20 down in the marathon first game against Tri Trieu to win 32-30, 17-21, 21-19 and Richard Lee beating the same player 20-22, 24-22, 21-17. NZ won 5-3. They also had 5-0 wins over Sri Lanka and Macao and a close 4-5 loss to Egypt.

The women dropped to 27th out of 36, four places down from their 1973 placing. They beat Brazil twice and had good wins over Canada and Greece. They lost to Luxembourg, Switzerland, Malaysia and Australia.

In the individual events only James Morris and Richard Lee proceeded beyond the qualifying rounds.

Trevor Flint had been team coach at the Commonwealths, traveling at his own expense. He did not go on to Calcutta and his input was missed.

Attending the Championships as newly-elected ITTF Vice-President (Oceania) was New Zealander Ken Wilkinson. He was astounded by the attention lavished on him in his unfamiliar role. He had the services of a full-time secretary, a chauffeur-driven car and 24 hour security provided by two body-guards on rotating shifts. “As far as I’m concerned this was unprecedented VIP treatment,” said Ken. “I don’t know why they went to such lengths.”

A moment of unexpected drama occurred during the singles semi-finals – a torrential downpour leaked through the roof and deposited large drops of water on the tables, causing a 75 minute suspension in play. “We had not had the time to test the roof to find out of it was leak-proof,” said an embarrassed West Bengal Government official. “But who had expected it to rain so heavily at this time of the year!” The 12,000 seat stadium had been erected in just four months and completed a mere ten days before the event.



Thanks rodderz for your comments on my article.

I am now sitting at home with an ice pack on my knee, from a table tennis injury. I thought that this is probably a good time to respond to all of he wonderful comments on my article on the 1975 World Championships. I do remember the opening ceremonies, which were impressive, but I was too young to appreciate them. I have no idea how those opening ceremonies compare with those in modern-day competitions. I have nice memories of the women's doubles final, because before the final I practiced with the Japanese woman that won the title. Its interesting that the name of the women's singles champion, Pak Yun Sun, had her name listed as Kim in both the New Zealand article, and even in the program. (I also mistakenly wrote her name as Kim in my article.) It sure is odd that an unseeded player with the wrong name in the program ends up winning the world championship!

The audience in India was very enthusiastic. One example that I remember was during the first day of the competition. I heard a loud roaring sound, unlikely anything I had previously heard in a table tennis tournament. At first I didn't know what was happening, and then realized it was the crowd cheering in awe as Secretin was able to lob back smash after smash.

I certainly remember the rainstorm that caused the long rain delay in the Takashima/Stipancic semifinal. Of course a rain delay is so odd in table tennis, especially a world championship. As I recall, Netaji stadium was built in a very short period of time, so perhaps water leaking through the roof was not surprising. The streets near the stadium were also flooded. However, February is the dry season in northeast India. Looking on the web, I was able to find the precipitation amounts for Calcutta in February 1975. There were no extreme amounts of rainfall indicated, which makes me wonder whether it was the poor drainage in this part of the city that accounted for the flooding.

Steven

_________________
Butterfly Joo Se Hyuk
Butterfly Tenergy 80-FX 1.9mm
TSP Curl P1R 1.4-1.7mm
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Returned to table tennis September 2011
Canada National Team Member, 1973-1975
--------------
1972-1987
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PostPosted: 08 Feb 2013, 11:14 
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zzzuppp wrote:
Nice post.

A couple of things-the Chinese woman using LP was probably Ge Xinai (Ke Hsian-Ai), who went on to become World Champion in 1979.

Also there was a notable occurence during the MS semi between Takashima and Stipancic-Rain stopped play! the roof began to leak and play had to be suspended for a while.

Tim Boggan says in his History of US TT that the Jonyer-Stipancic Final was the worst he ever saw, both players nervous and prone to error, particularly Jonyer at the start.
Poor Stipancic lost the Singles final, the Doubles Final and the Team final at Calcutta...

I would love to see some video footage of the Calcutta Worlds-all I've ever seen is some of the team Finals and one rally from the MD Final. There must be more out there somewhere.


zzzupp, Thanks for the your comments, and thanks for reminding me that Ke Hsian-Ai was the player that I was referring to. With regard to the rain, I did comment on it in my response to rodderz a few minutes ago. I wondering if the outcome would have been different without the rain delay! Its interesting that Tim Boggan wrote that this was the worst final that he ever saw. Of course, since I played in just one world championship, I cannot compare. Nevertheless, it was very exciting for me. I'd love to see some footage too. I did see a brief clip from the team final. That was quite nostalgic.

Steven

_________________
Butterfly Joo Se Hyuk
Butterfly Tenergy 80-FX 1.9mm
TSP Curl P1R 1.4-1.7mm
--------------
Returned to table tennis September 2011
Canada National Team Member, 1973-1975
--------------
1972-1987
Brickell Balsa/Birch 3-ply Blade
Yasaka Mark V 1.5mm
Joola Toni Hold AntiTopspin 2.5mm


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