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PostPosted: 18 Oct 2017, 22:16 
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Brett Clarke wrote:
I've been trying to learn Chinese (Mandarin) for quite some time, but I couldn't get the accent right. I then realized that little kids seem to learn languages really fast, without a thick accent, so I had a great idea. I got down on my knees and spoke Mandarin and my accent simply disappeared after 5 minutes!


:clap: :lol: :rofl: Bravo !

I once saw Chinese coaching video where they were teaching looping not based on whether player was crouching down or standing straight. Chinese coach simply said doesn't matter as long as mechanics allow it are good and repeatable. Would you say that is very true Brett ? Even if I don't squat like Jet Li or Jackie Chan in the "Horse Stance" position, I can still play properly ? :-)

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PostPosted: 18 Oct 2017, 23:13 
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man_iii wrote:
Brett Clarke wrote:
I've been trying to learn Chinese (Mandarin) for quite some time, but I couldn't get the accent right. I then realized that little kids seem to learn languages really fast, without a thick accent, so I had a great idea. I got down on my knees and spoke Mandarin and my accent simply disappeared after 5 minutes!


:clap: :lol: :rofl: Bravo !

I once saw Chinese coaching video where they were teaching looping not based on whether player was crouching down or standing straight. Chinese coach simply said doesn't matter as long as mechanics allow it are good and repeatable. Would you say that is very true Brett ? Even if I don't squat like Jet Li or Jackie Chan in the "Horse Stance" position, I can still play properly ? :-)


Man (iii), I think I've already said too much.

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PostPosted: 18 Oct 2017, 23:21 
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Someone recently told me that he meant no offense but that I looped underspin without really bending my knees and he wondered how I did it. I told him that I just straighten my arms, get enough distance from the ball and hook it when I want to make sure it clears the net. I learned that from watching lots of Xu Xin videos. I probably get a bit lower to do it but not all the time.

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PostPosted: 19 Oct 2017, 00:52 
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PostPosted: 19 Oct 2017, 06:01 
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Quote:
I've been trying to learn Chinese (Mandarin) for quite some time, but I couldn't get the accent right. I then realized that little kids seem to learn languages really fast, without a thick accent, so I had a great idea. I got down on my knees and spoke Mandarin and my accent simply disappeared after 5 minutes!


Aww, so this means you're not going to make the LTT88 squat forehand video ?


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PostPosted: 19 Oct 2017, 10:02 
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BRS wrote:
Are there any videos on ttedge of drills to improve your handling of balls to the elbow?

When I went to camp I saw a lot of coached juniors, and one thing I noticed about them was in backhand drills if a ball mistakenly came to their elbow or near forehand they automatically turned for the fh. I've worked on that some and it's better, but the problem I still have is that I leave my right foot planted. I turn at the shoulders and waist, but without moving my foot back to be almost perpendicular to the table, I'm still jammed to where I can't hit a proper fh.

The one drill I know for this is from te13 to loop all to the blocker's bh, they block to my bh 60% of the table, and I react correctly to make the right stroke for each ball. Does this seem like a reasonable drill for this problem, or are there others/better?


I think TE13 is a pretty good video and drill. Getting your right leg into position early is very important as it gives you the necessary space and allows you to still rotate your body correctly. Unless you have an amazing backhand, I think most players should be looking to play forehand.

How quickly you read your opponent's shot is the hidden factor here. Footwork and torso maneuvering doesn't work if you read the direction late.

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PostPosted: 19 Oct 2017, 10:28 
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goodtechnique wrote:
Following up on the issue of starting young usually = good mechanics, I watched LTT41 again. As per per previous discussions on this topic I understand good mechanics in general is a balance between getting the correct feeling in the forearm as well as the lower body. However in my opinion, getting the feeling of good mechanics in terms of how the wrist and forearm move is much more difficult than getting the feeling of how to generate good mechanics using rotation (as discussed in LTT86) . Unfortunately, I feel it's the first category that's required in the more difficult areas of the game such as service return, and fast exchanges close to the table. I think a lot of players can relate to that feeling, of being in the right position to play a good shot without necessarily wanting to hit a very aggressive stroke, but failing to get any momentum or control on the ball due to poor mechanics.


I get this post. It's relatively easy to stand there and topspin against block. Playing in a combat situation is much much more difficult. It takes years to really master the combat side of this sport. It's also hard to deal with the fact that good technique doesn't necessarily improve your results in the short term. It's possible to go backwards for a while because you become too focused on yourself.

I think it's a matter of moving everything forward together and understanding it's a long term process.

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PostPosted: 19 Oct 2017, 19:55 
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I get this post. It's relatively easy to stand there and topspin against block. Playing in a combat situation is much much more difficult. It takes years to really master the combat side of this sport. It's also hard to deal with the fact that good technique doesn't necessarily improve your results in the short term. It's possible to go backwards for a while because you become too focused on yourself.

I think it's a matter of moving everything forward together and understanding it's a long term process


That's true, and like everyone else sometimes I find it frustrating that I'm not progressing as well as I would like in certain areas of the game. I'm not looking for a quick fix to reach a high level in this game because obviously that doesn't exist. It just seems reasonable to me that there might be a way to develop better technique where fine motor skills are required. Maybe there isn't. It could be something intangible that you pick up over time. Like you say, to really be fluent requires years of practice and a comprehensive training routine.

In the meantime, I'll just have to work on making my hip turns smaller :)


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PostPosted: 19 Oct 2017, 22:33 
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goodtechnique wrote:
Quote:
I get this post. It's relatively easy to stand there and topspin against block. Playing in a combat situation is much much more difficult. It takes years to really master the combat side of this sport. It's also hard to deal with the fact that good technique doesn't necessarily improve your results in the short term. It's possible to go backwards for a while because you become too focused on yourself.

I think it's a matter of moving everything forward together and understanding it's a long term process


That's true, and like everyone else sometimes I find it frustrating that I'm not progressing as well as I would like in certain areas of the game. I'm not looking for a quick fix to reach a high level in this game because obviously that doesn't exist. It just seems reasonable to me that there might be a way to develop better technique where fine motor skills are required. Maybe there isn't. It could be something intangible that you pick up over time. Like you say, to really be fluent requires years of practice and a comprehensive training routine.

In the meantime, I'll just have to work on making my hip turns smaller :)


Actually a quick fix does exist, it's just not that easy to obtain. When I play/practice TT five to seven hours every day in a proper training environment with good coaches and lots of other players I improve roughly 52 times as fast as my normal training routine of seven hours drills a week with two of my friends. So all you have to do to radically accelerate your learning is devote your whole life to TT. Like I said, it would require some commitment. But it works. And it's fun! Full-time TT training is literally my favorite thing. I'm going to TTPor Atema in Setubal PT for two weeks in December. I don't think it will be as ridiculously awesome as the B75 camp, but nothing could be.


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PostPosted: 20 Oct 2017, 01:09 
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BRS wrote:
Actually a quick fix does exist, it's just not that easy to obtain. When I play/practice TT five to seven hours every day in a proper training environment with good coaches and lots of other players I improve roughly 52 times as fast as my normal training routine of seven hours drills a week with two of my friends. So all you have to do to radically accelerate your learning is devote your whole life to TT. Like I said, it would require some commitment. But it works. And it's fun! Full-time TT training is literally my favorite thing. I'm going to TTPor Atema in Setubal PT for two weeks in December. I don't think it will be as ridiculously awesome as the B75 camp, but nothing could be.


I also like training camps a lot. I like the atmosphere of being around many people who practice hard with dedication. BRS, I guess you went to B75? I heard a lot about and even thought of going there, but it didn't click. Were there many adults among camp participants?

I wonder though for how long a typical "learning adult" can carry on the 7 hours per day practice schedule before burning out. My bet is one to three weeks (three for really fit ones). I remember that when I went to LYTTC camps, I felt quite empty after a week, and used to fall asleep at 9 o'clock or around every day.


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PostPosted: 20 Oct 2017, 01:17 
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fastmover wrote:
BRS wrote:
Actually a quick fix does exist, it's just not that easy to obtain. When I play/practice TT five to seven hours every day in a proper training environment with good coaches and lots of other players I improve roughly 52 times as fast as my normal training routine of seven hours drills a week with two of my friends. So all you have to do to radically accelerate your learning is devote your whole life to TT. Like I said, it would require some commitment. But it works. And it's fun! Full-time TT training is literally my favorite thing. I'm going to TTPor Atema in Setubal PT for two weeks in December. I don't think it will be as ridiculously awesome as the B75 camp, but nothing could be.


I also like training camps a lot. I like the atmosphere of being around many people who practice hard with dedication. BRS, I guess you went to B75? I heard a lot about and even thought of going there, but it didn't click. Were there many adults among camp participants?

I wonder though for how long a typical "learning adult" can carry on the 7 hours per day practice schedule before burning out. My bet is one to three weeks (three for really fit ones). I remember that when I went to LYTTC camps, I felt quite empty after a week, and used to fall asleep at 9 o'clock or around every day.


B75 was amazing. About 25% adults, but concentrated in the upper and lower groups. I was there 17 days and got a bit overtrained at the end. I'd say three weeks is pushing my physical limit, and two is probably optimal.


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PostPosted: 20 Oct 2017, 14:04 
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Since I can't move, trying to build a stroke that takes the ball earlier. My recovery isn't good though that might be the drill speed. Comments welcome (don't worry, I won't defend myself, just looking to see if anything anyone recommends can help).


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PostPosted: 20 Oct 2017, 15:50 
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BRS wrote:
Are there any videos on ttedge of drills to improve your handling of balls to the elbow?

When I went to camp I saw a lot of coached juniors, and one thing I noticed about them was in backhand drills if a ball mistakenly came to their elbow or near forehand they automatically turned for the fh. I've worked on that some and it's better, but the problem I still have is that I leave my right foot planted. I turn at the shoulders and waist, but without moving my foot back to be almost perpendicular to the table, I'm still jammed to where I can't hit a proper fh.

The one drill I know for this is from te13 to loop all to the blocker's bh, they block to my bh 60% of the table, and I react correctly to make the right stroke for each ball. Does this seem like a reasonable drill for this problem, or are there others/better?


I guess this isn't answering the question but I really like this 'solution' to the shoulder ball issue.

https://youtu.be/Vyv3DppVXYA?t=426

FZD seems to commit to a round-house forehand where he moves towards the backhand side a little and loops big to the forehand corner. It's downright impressive. I've tried this and If I go for the forehand side it feels pretty darn good. Sadly I don't look nearly as cool just yet.

Ever have one of those guys to hit with that ONLY sends the first ball to your shoulder leaving this awkward weak return because you don't want to kill it? Well I've decided that is the perfect time to work on this very shot.


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PostPosted: 20 Oct 2017, 20:24 
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NextLevel wrote:
Since I can't move, trying to build a stroke that takes the ball earlier. My recovery isn't good though that might be the drill speed. Comments welcome (don't worry, I won't defend myself, just looking to see if anything anyone recommends can help).



Is it possible for you to snap forward your shoulder ? And use the shoulder rotation as an upper-body flex for your FH Top-spin loops ? I notice that as a CPH player trying to develop an aggressive all-out FH topspin, my shoulder starts lowered ( relaxed position for me, LGL does this exaggeratedly ) and then it rolls over, up and forward as I finish my stroke. Right now this FH topspin loop is aggressive but very slow, I haven't figured out how to do FH loops like LGL, Ma Lin, XX, Wong Chun-Ting yet :-D

I think you mentioned previous back-injury which prevents you from doing the hip rotations. One TT player is also in similar situation and he uses a very late "shoulder" shot that is like a quick jerking of the shoulder + forearm + wrist.

Also, I am still a beginner so my advise is probably not very good :-D

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  • DHS PowerG-9 : FH/BH-729SuperFX
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Fun blades:
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PostPosted: 21 Oct 2017, 13:26 
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