OOAK Table Tennis Forum
http://ooakforum.com/

TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False
http://ooakforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=4831
Page 18 of 20

Author:  hookshot [ 20 Nov 2013, 07:23 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

There used to be a rule where even if the ball would clearly miss the table but it hit your bat, you would lose the point. That rule does not exhist anymore.

The flat palm rule is very lax. You would have to really cup the ball before you would get called in most tourneys. :)

Author:  spinspin [ 20 Nov 2013, 21:39 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

hookshot wrote:
There used to be a rule where even if the ball would clearly miss the table but it hit your bat, you would lose the point. That rule does not exhist anymore.

The flat palm rule is very lax. You would have to really cup the ball before you would get called in most tourneys. :)


Thanks. Can you tell I used to play a long time ago. I feel old now! it's all new this toss and flat hand/palm rule.

Author:  Red_lion [ 21 Nov 2013, 09:12 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

It's easy to adopt to this open palm thing. There is another term being used today and its very expensive to adopt with it. EJ :) .

Author:  BeRReGoN [ 28 Nov 2013, 12:09 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

Is it legal to alter the rubber where you put your fingers on the backside of a penhold grip?

Ex:
http://images5.fotop.net/albums2/rxng/c ... ggg555.jpg
http://mytabletennis.net/forum/uploads/ ... C00490.JPG

I've read Wang Hao do so, so it must be ok?

I have a hard chinese rubber on the backside so it doesn't take much sweat to be slippery and impossible to control my reverse penhold backhand

Author:  haggisv [ 28 Nov 2013, 22:38 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

Technically it's not legal if you use that side, although some 'wear and tear' is allowed.

Author:  BeRReGoN [ 28 Nov 2013, 23:04 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

haggisv wrote:
Technically it's not legal if you use that side, although some 'wear and tear' is allowed.

So it's another case of not legal but top players get away with it? In many photos and even in his instructional video, Wang Hao backside is modified where he put his fingers (probably sanded?). He definitely uses that side! :P

Author:  loopkill [ 29 Nov 2013, 09:52 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

This is not so much a rule as an urban legend or belief.

Some very talented chinese exchange students at my university and myself would regularly get together and play. They all played for much longer than I have and played often in China. The first time we went to the big tt club in the next city over they all complained about the massive space the club had.

They claimed that our balls moved quite slowly in the the club because of the overall area of the gymnasium. Too much open air with high ceilings and open setup. They said they had grown too used to the smaller space we had at school, where with less airspace (which to them equaled more air pressure) equaled faster shots away from the table. Other chinese they spoke too their seemed to concur with them.

But this made almost no sense to me and seemed more like a psychological thing.

Has anyone ever experienced or heard of this??

Author:  Red_lion [ 29 Nov 2013, 17:54 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

I have red this space thing in this site and it was also concluded that spce does affect speed. I'll try to find the link.

Author:  iskandar taib [ 20 Jan 2014, 02:23 ]
Post subject:  Re:

gibxam wrote:
....sigh it looks like silver beat me to it MM but I have some interesting reading to back up what he said :)

Quote:
Hitting the Ball

It is considered legal to hit the ball with your fingers, or with your racket hand below the wrist, or even any part of the bat.(Law 2.5.7) This means that you could quite legally return the ball by

1. hitting it with the back of your racket hand;
2. hitting it with the edge of the bat, instead of the rubber;
3. hitting it with the handle of the bat.

There are a couple of important provisos though:

1. Your hand is only your racket hand if it is holding the racket, so this means you can't drop your bat and then hit the ball with your hand, because your hand is no longer your racket hand. (Point 9.2 HMO)
2. You are not allowed to hit the ball twice, so if the ball hits your fingers, and then bounces and hits your bat, this is considered a double hit and you lose the point. (Law 2.10.1.6) If the ball hits your hand and the bat at the same time, then this is not a double hit. It can be hard to tell the difference!


So has anyone tried developing a off-the-back-of-the-hand dropshot? Sounds like it might be useful (if sometimes painful!).

Iskandar

Author:  iskandar taib [ 20 Jan 2014, 02:26 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

loopkill wrote:
This is not so much a rule as an urban legend or belief.

Some very talented chinese exchange students at my university and myself would regularly get together and play. They all played for much longer than I have and played often in China. The first time we went to the big tt club in the next city over they all complained about the massive space the club had.

They claimed that our balls moved quite slowly in the the club because of the overall area of the gymnasium. Too much open air with high ceilings and open setup. They said they had grown too used to the smaller space we had at school, where with less airspace (which to them equaled more air pressure) equaled faster shots away from the table. Other chinese they spoke too their seemed to concur with them.

But this made almost no sense to me and seemed more like a psychological thing.

Has anyone ever experienced or heard of this??


Can't say I have. I'm guessing they aren't physics or engineering majors, right?

Iskandar

Author:  iskandar taib [ 20 Jan 2014, 02:36 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

haggisv wrote:
THE GAMEr wrote:
Foot stamping. Can I do it? I'm not doing it with the intent to disrupt the opponent, it just happens.

There is no rule against it, but if the umpire deems it's disruptive to the game, even if that is not your intent, you can still get warning and lose points if it continues. I've never seen this happen though.


Haven't seen it happen in person but I read about a couple of occasions many years ago. This was before the two color rule and people were stamping HARD on the serve to prevent their opponent from hearing the contact with the bat. One occasion was at a major tournament when umpires were told to call lets when this happened. The columnist thought they were being overzealous with this, with even minor foot thumps being called. The other occasion was at an international tournament - I think it was Eric Boggan vs. a well-known English player at the time. Apparently Eric was stamping on the serve and the ump wasn't calling him on it. The other player then deliberately stamped really loudly a couple of times, for which lets were called. He then told the ref, well, right, please do that when Mr. Boggan does it. Eric Boggan played with Anti, the English guy, IIRC, was a chopper with long pips.

Iskandar

Author:  passifid [ 03 Feb 2014, 22:59 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

loopkill wrote:
This is not so much a rule as an urban legend or belief.

Some very talented chinese exchange students at my university and myself would regularly get together and play. They all played for much longer than I have and played often in China. The first time we went to the big tt club in the next city over they all complained about the massive space the club had.

They claimed that our balls moved quite slowly in the the club because of the overall area of the gymnasium. Too much open air with high ceilings and open setup. They said they had grown too used to the smaller space we had at school, where with less airspace (which to them equaled more air pressure) equaled faster shots away from the table. Other chinese they spoke too their seemed to concur with them.

But this made almost no sense to me and seemed more like a psychological thing.

Has anyone ever experienced or heard of this??

i'm not a major or degree level but i do have an A at a level and a general interest in physics(i was going to do it at uni but its more i'm good at it rather then i enjoy it).
but that is OBVIOUS bollocks. firstly a higher air pressure would ONLY be achievable if your entire hall was completely sealed, like a coke can, because like a coke bottle you can see all the pressure escapes from a small hole, the draughts and air vents will maintain atmospheric pressure.

maybe you were using different or worse balls? but i think personally its just because it was different they played differently because they were not used to it, or because the area is bigger it feels slower because the ball moves over 1/4 of the hall rather than 1/2 when you hit it. there is no reason for under the same conditions to hit a ball with the same force and the same equipment and it to have a different amount kinetic energy

Author:  Red_lion [ 04 Feb 2014, 09:12 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

Welcome to the forum passifid. Care to introduce yourself? You have a very interesting first post.

Author:  rodderz [ 04 Feb 2014, 09:43 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

loopkill wrote:
This is not so much a rule as an urban legend or belief.

Some very talented chinese exchange students at my university and myself would regularly get together and play. They all played for much longer than I have and played often in China. The first time we went to the big tt club in the next city over they all complained about the massive space the club had.

They claimed that our balls moved quite slowly in the the club because of the overall area of the gymnasium. Too much open air with high ceilings and open setup. They said they had grown too used to the smaller space we had at school, where with less airspace (which to them equaled more air pressure) equaled faster shots away from the table. Other chinese they spoke too their seemed to concur with them.

But this made almost no sense to me and seemed more like a psychological thing.

Has anyone ever experienced or heard of this??

any new venue will feel different, (lighting, wall colours, balls type , table type, etc etc)

Author:  iskandar taib [ 04 Feb 2014, 14:00 ]
Post subject:  Re: TT Rules. Questions and Urban Legends - True or False

spinspin wrote:
hookshot wrote:
There used to be a rule where even if the ball would clearly miss the table but it hit your bat, you would lose the point. That rule does not exhist anymore.

The flat palm rule is very lax. You would have to really cup the ball before you would get called in most tourneys. :)


Thanks. Can you tell I used to play a long time ago. I feel old now! it's all new this toss and flat hand/palm rule.


Gee.. that must have a long, long, long, LONG time ago. The flat palm rule's been in effect for more than a half century! Probably came into being in the 1940s even. Apparently someone invented "finger spin" serves - you squeeze the ball between the fingers, giving it spin, and project the ball onto the bat (hard rubber or, sometimes, sandpaper back then). Not surprisingly, it wasn't long before everyone was doing it. Totally unpredictable, and so they instituted the open palm rule.

Iskandar

Page 18 of 20 All times are UTC + 9:30 hours
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
http://www.phpbb.com/