OOAK Table Tennis Forum


A truly International Table Tennis Community for both Defensive and Offensive styles!
Live Table Tennis Videos Table Tennis News Live OOAK Forum Links About OOAK Table Tennis Forum OOAK Forum Memory
It is currently 21 Feb 2017, 00:54


Don't want to see any advertising? Become a member and login, and you'll never see an ad again!



All times are UTC + 9:30 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 68 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: 08 Mar 2012, 03:39 
Offline
OOAK Super User
OOAK Super User
User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2007, 01:37
Posts: 1652
Location: Netherlands
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 176 times
cyber1call
Quote:
So far my biggest weakness with the NBA is high balls deep to the bh corner...but that was a weakness with the LPs too! (Any suggestions as to how to deal with that?)

It is psychological for the most part. With your backhand you can't reach up and hit as you can with your forehand, so a high bouncing ball seems a threat. But it isn't, really. You can spot them coming, as they go high over the net also, and be prepared - move into the ball and flat hit it before it is too high. Make contact when it is coming up and at just below shoulder height - use your anti. Hit hard. Those balls won't come back (likely...).

_________________
Without opponent, no match.


Top
 Profile  
 


Don't want to see this advertisement? Become a member and login, and you'll never see an ad again!

PostPosted: 08 Mar 2012, 18:51 
Offline
Super User

Joined: 30 May 2011, 22:19
Posts: 382
Location: India
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 6 times
I recall the NBA a little. In this respect, I think it acts similar to the Timeless I use now. On high balls you can use the residual grippiness of the rubber and perform a steep chopping motion taking care that the contact time is as long as possible - so kind of caress the ball, but with rather fast a motion. These returns tend to go long, so test them with a ball machine first; but performed that way, they are fast and have quite a bit of backspin that may confuse your opponent used to get dumb balls or some spin reversal from you.

Edit: Haven't seen Kees' answer. Try both suggestions and tell us which one is working better for you.

_________________
Equipment: Evo MX-P 2.2 - On Elmstreet - Timeless 1.9


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 09 Mar 2012, 02:07 
Offline
Horse Hockey!
User avatar

Joined: 03 Dec 2009, 03:25
Posts: 978
Location: North Carolina, USA
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 29 times
Thanks guys...I'll have to practice both techniques. It may depend on how high and how deep a ball is. I certainly despise those balls than land on the white line right in the backhand corner. Can anyone return those?

BTW, when possible I've been trying to get my lazy butt to move around and hit these with my forehand! :lol:

 

_________________
Giant Dragon Kris Special : RITC 802 w/Dawei 2.2 35d fh : : Donic Blue Fire M3 2.0 black bh
Member of Charlotte Table Tennis Club, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA
Visit Charlotte Table Tennis Club on Facebook


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 10 Mar 2012, 20:38 
Offline
OOAK Super User
OOAK Super User
User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2007, 01:37
Posts: 1652
Location: Netherlands
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 176 times
Yesterday I bought the Joola Toni Hold Anti Topspin in black 1.5 mm, to use it on a Joola Toni Hold Whitespot blade, with Joola Topspin C red 1.8 mm on the forehand. This antispin rubber has been reviewed in this forum before, but is such a remarkable piece of equipment that it can stand some more.
It is a chopper-attacker's anti; unsuitable for blocking and pushing with spin-reversal close to the table, as it doesn't reverse much on passive strokes, and also unsuitable for attackers as it is the slowest anti on the market, beating the Tibhar Ellen Def with a narrow margin.
An oddity: it is the only rubber I know that comes in an oval shape out of the package; you have to cut a strip from the bottom in order to fit it against the handle of your blade - measure first, cut later, or it won't fit the blade at all anymore, for it is not extremely large. But it fits the Joola TH Wh just fine. It is reputed to be heavy, but I found it just a little bit heavier than the Ellen, and no problem at all.
I tested it this morning playing against the robot for two hours (tomorrow I will play a tournament with it) and from the first stroke I loved it. It is by reputation the anti with the best control on the market and now that I have played it I can believe that. Every stroke was effortless with it and even the fiercest spin I could get from the robot was easily returned.
Chopping against no-spin you can get a little backspin if you use the wrist; chopping against topspin you can get a lot. Varying spin chopping lightly or hard is equally easy, as the rubber hardly reacts to incoming spin, so you feel you are able to put on the ball whatever spin you like. Floating (feigning a chop, and then just press the ball over the net) the ball will go low and where you want it exactly, with almost no spin on it, which is an extra variation. Chopping against backspin is easy too, but almost a waste, as attacking backspin is very effective even from mid-distance - a loop-like stroke will produce fierce topspin and the ball will land short behind the net, rushing away, but a hard floater (hitting the descending ball with a slightly open bat) will produce a low ball with a flat trajectory landing deep with almost no spin on it, skidding off the table.
The rubber can attack pretty much every ball including heavy topspin (on the rise or on the top) and depending on the type of stroke you use for it the ball will be returned with heavy spin (active stroke, going with the incoming spin and thus reversing it) or almost none (passive stroke or active stroke going against the incoming spin). This variation, together with the precision in placement, constitutes the effectiveness as the speed of attacks is not high.
If I had to compare it with an LP, I would say it comes very close to Feint Long III in many respects, including its tactical use, except that it has an even better (far better) control.
All in all this rubber plays a lot like the Ellen Def, but is easier to handle and more effective. It is twice the price of the Ellen, but I think it is worth it. Tomorrow I'll know...

_________________
Without opponent, no match.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 11 Mar 2012, 04:10 
Offline
Secret Agent Double OX
Secret Agent Double OX
User avatar

Joined: 05 Oct 2007, 06:49
Posts: 10545
Location: USA
Has thanked: 267 times
Been thanked: 348 times
Blade: Tibhar CO-S-3
FH: Dr. Neubauer Leopard
BH: D.TecS SPEZIAL OX
I have a White Spot with a black 1.5mm TH Antitop on the forehand and red Butterfly Tackiness Chop 1.1 on the backhand (same as a top Spanish anti player we've featured in the video section). It's a lot of fun as long as I can stay reasonably close to the table. Unfortunately, I don't have enough mobility to use it against good attackers.

_________________



The MNNB Blog has had some pretty amazing stuff lately. Just click this text to check it out.
| My OOAK Interview
Table Tennis Video Links: itTV | laola1.tv | ttbl | fftt | Challenger Series | mnnb-tv

Coach Li: Kill the game against long pimps! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EAHNaiIhnWM


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 11 Mar 2012, 05:48 
Offline
OOAK Super User
OOAK Super User
User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2007, 01:37
Posts: 1652
Location: Netherlands
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 176 times
I agree, mobility is essential when using grippy anti; the anti will absorb the opponent's attacks, but you need to move around to get behind the ball with the inverted to win the point, at least most of the time. Limited mobility sort of forces a player to use very slick stuff with attacking potential. And as there are many different kinds of limitations, you need something tailor-made. That is, after you have figured out how to instruct the "tailor". It is a tough deal... On the other hand, intellectually it is fun to try and figure it out, not just for yourself, but the principles of it, and in the sport itself it is fun to test your solutions. Maybe we should collaborate on that on the forum... It might be a good subject for this section.

_________________
Without opponent, no match.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 13 Mar 2012, 05:00 
Offline
Horse Hockey!
User avatar

Joined: 03 Dec 2009, 03:25
Posts: 978
Location: North Carolina, USA
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 29 times
Kees, maybe you can answer a technique question.

As mentioned earlier I've just switched from LPs to Nittaku Best Anti. This weekend I had some multi-ball training and was concentrating on the attacking hit with the anti. The NBA does have just enough grip that I can do a slow loop with it, but I want to develop a "put away shot."

My coach (who is not very familiar with anti) wants my entire wrist and forearm to follow through and wind up fully extended toward the target with the fh rubber facing up. This is very much like the regular inverted stroke I've been taught and use when I twiddle. Two problems though: even though the NBA has a little bit of grip, I just couldn't control the ball enough with this technique and also, over time I'm afraid I will get "tennis elbow" from the full extension. (One reason I switched to pips originally.)

I seem to hit better and with more control (though not real powerful yet) when my follow through is more up at a 45deg angle with the bh rubber facing the target in more of punch block with a more upward thrust at the end. Is that acceptable technique for anti?

 

_________________
Giant Dragon Kris Special : RITC 802 w/Dawei 2.2 35d fh : : Donic Blue Fire M3 2.0 black bh
Member of Charlotte Table Tennis Club, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA
Visit Charlotte Table Tennis Club on Facebook


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 13 Mar 2012, 05:47 
Offline
OOAK Super User
OOAK Super User
User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2007, 01:37
Posts: 1652
Location: Netherlands
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 176 times
cyber1call
Quote:
I seem to hit better and with more control (though not real powerful yet) when my follow through is more up at a 45deg angle with the bh rubber facing the target in more of punch block with a more upward thrust at the end. Is that acceptable technique for anti?

If it works for you, it works. My guess would be that in fact you are opening your blade during the stroke, which - if it is necessary - would indicate an absence of the degree of friction you need to perform an actual stroke. Generally, with slick anti's (Neubauer anti's are among the slickest) you shouldn't perform a stroke as you can't really grip the ball, but instead perform a punch: contact the ball on the rise or at its highest point, have your bat behind it and punch short and dry (no grazing). Hitting against topspin, even when it is weak, you have to be aware of the fact that your return will have backspin and the ball will not drop or land unless you hit it directly towards the table. Hitting hard against medium to heavy topspin will produce a ball that floats over the table, and should be avoided, unless the ball is so high you can smash directly to the table.
This may be informative on the subject: viewtopic.php?f=17&t=18236.

Attacking backspin is another matter - this you really can do with a slick anti too, always, but hitting (or driving or rolling) is not the best and safest option. Instead open your bat very slightly and shove it directly into the ball, contacting it on the rise; the ball will go low over the net and have topspin, so you can shove hard. You can attack descending balls too, even away from the table, but you have to help them up over the net, so you have to open your bat a bit more and sort of fast-ladle the ball, giving it good speed; this is the only shot I am aware of which actually benefits from a good follow-through, that is, it needs a serious stroke-like action.

See if you can find footage on youtube of Neubauer himself demonstrating strokes with his anti's - it is the best advice on how to use them you can get. There is also a now out of date DVD of him demonstrating techniques with his frictionless LP's - you can do all strokes in a similar way with his anti's.

If this doesn't help, perhaps you can give more detail. What kind of ball do you want to put away (how high, what spin on it, where is it over the table)? With backhand or forehand?

By the way, your coach seems to think your anti behaves like a short or medium pip, or a very grippy LP on sponge. Perhaps it would be an idea to have him play with your equipment so he can feel for himself how it does behave.

As a rule, never fully stretch your arm on any stroke in the follow-through. There is no purpose to it and it certainly will damage tendons and ligaments.

PS: If your coach isn't fully acquainted with the use of anti's, that needn't be a problem. The best coach you can get is one who, when asked for something he doesn't know, will propose to find it out - together with you.

_________________
Without opponent, no match.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 13 Mar 2012, 06:24 
Offline
Horse Hockey!
User avatar

Joined: 03 Dec 2009, 03:25
Posts: 978
Location: North Carolina, USA
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 29 times
Kees wrote:
cyber1call
Quote:
I seem to hit better and with more control (though not real powerful yet) when my follow through is more up at a 45deg angle with the bh rubber facing the target in more of punch block with a more upward thrust at the end. Is that acceptable technique for anti?

If it works for you, it works. My guess would be that in fact you are opening your blade during the stroke, which - if it is necessary - would indicate an absence of the degree of friction you need to perform an actual stroke. Generally, with slick anti's (Neubauer anti's are among the slickest) you shouldn't perform a stroke as you can't really grip the ball, but instead perform a punch: contact the ball on the rise or at its highest point, have your bat behind it and punch short and dry (no grazing). Hitting against topspin, even when it is weak, you have to be aware of the fact that your return will have backspin and the ball will not drop or land unless you hit it directly towards the table. Hitting hard against medium to heavy topspin will produce a ball that floats over the table, and should be avoided, unless the ball is so high you can smash directly to the table.
This may be informative on the subject: viewtopic.php?f=17&t=18236.

Attacking backspin is another matter - this you really can do with a slick anti too, always, but hitting (or driving or rolling) is not the best and safest option. Instead open your bat very slightly and shove it directly into the ball, contacting it on the rise; the ball will go low over the net and have topspin, so you can shove hard. You can attack descending balls too, even away from the table, but you have to help them up over the net, so you have to open your bat a bit more and sort of fast-ladle the ball, giving it good speed; this is the only shot I am aware of which actually benefits from a good follow-through, that is, it needs a serious stroke-like action.

See if you can find footage on youtube of Neubauer himself demonstrating strokes with his anti's - it is the best advice on how to use them you can get. There is also a now out of date DVD of him demonstrating techniques with his frictionless LP's - you can do all strokes in a similar way with his anti's.

If this doesn't help, perhaps you can give more detail. What kind of ball do you want to put away (how high, what spin on it, where is it over the table)? With backhand or forehand?

By the way, your coach seems to think your anti behaves like a short or medium pip, or a very grippy LP on sponge. Perhaps it would be an idea to have him play with your equipment so he can feel for himself how it does behave.

As a rule, never fully stretch your arm on any stroke in the follow-through. There is no purpose to it and it certainly will damage tendons and ligaments.

Thanks! I think you may be right that he sees this as working like a short pip. Funny though how this coach and another who is even more adamant about it stresses the backhand stroke finish with the extended arm pointing at the target. With the first coach I developed painful tennis elbow that finally went away 6 months after changing to LPs. I could feel the stress on the tendons already in the recent session and surely don't want to go down that road again.

As for the Nittaku Best Anti, on incoming slow topspin loops or no-spin balls I really can "loop it"...though the result is actually a really slow ball with a touch of topspin or just no spin at all. My opponents often whiff at the ball and miss completely because it kind of looks like a normal slow loop but it throws their timing off. The harder I "loop it" the more it seems to throw them off because from my motion it looks like it should be a much faster or spinnier ball. It has to be well placed though or it gets killed!

But the hit I'm looking to develop is in response to those players who push to my backhand either with underspin or no spin. With the LPs (many, many rubber/blade combinations) I never could control hitting these even against underspin. So naturally, I got a lot of these balls and could do little but push it back until a returned one too high or poorly placed and lost the point.

The hit that seems to work for me now starts with an open blade and I punch through it hard without closing the blade too much. My coach was telling me "Don't push!" so I guess he is seeing an open blade that stays open through the stroke. I was watching Amelia Solje and she does something similar except she puts much more side swipe on the ball as opposed to punching through it. Maybe that's the answer to mix things up!

I also like your idea of having my coach play with my anti. That would probably prove to one or the other of us which technique is correct.

 

_________________
Giant Dragon Kris Special : RITC 802 w/Dawei 2.2 35d fh : : Donic Blue Fire M3 2.0 black bh
Member of Charlotte Table Tennis Club, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA
Visit Charlotte Table Tennis Club on Facebook


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 13 Mar 2012, 15:44 
Offline
OOAK Super User
OOAK Super User
User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2007, 01:37
Posts: 1652
Location: Netherlands
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 176 times
@Cyber1call,

I must be getting old - or tired, or both; anyhow, I took the NBA to mean Neubauer something or other, which is plain stupid. Sorry, I'll try to make up for it...

Nittaku Best Anti is a grippy anti and you should be able to attack against both no-spin and backspin without problems.
1. Weak spin or no-spin pushes tend to come in short and relatively high. Even so, you have to help them over the net and this is where you have to use the wrist: cock it and lift your elbow, bringing it forward so your underarm is horizontal and your hand "drops", bringing the tip of your bat to about 9 or 8 o'clock, bring your bat behind the ball and be very sure to stand low (face at ball height, or you will risk contacting the ball too high and shove it into the net; move one leg under the table for this), then catch the ball in your rubber and snap upwards and a bit forward. Follow through mostly upward. Aim to cut the sidelines, for you will not make much speed or spin.
This is a flick. You can scoop/push weak spin balls, but there will be little topspin on the return and the ball will land deep and be easily attacked.
2. Weak spin or no-spin balls that come deep on your half of the table can be attacked harder, essentially with the same stroke, but there should be more forward action and less upward action in it; also, you do not have to cock your wrist that much. This stroke probably comes close to what you are already doing, perhaps except for the fact that you have your bat open - opening it slightly feels safe, but you can close it a bit if the ball is high enough, as long as you make sure to hit the ball into your sponge, and the wrist-action helps with that. Aim for the sidelines or the elbow.
This is a punch. Scooping like Amelie Solja is only possible against good spin and with a slick anti. Less slick anti's will scoop fine, but you will have to help to help reversal by going with the spin on the ball. The best thing for this is a side-sweep.

A grippy anti like the Nittaku really does play somewhat like a short or medium pip as it has only slightly less grip. The stroke prescribed by your coach will work, but needs very good timing and fierce short wrist-action. Even then I would advise against over-stretching the arm. Pointing the way the ball went is correct, as it is a way to make sure you do not graze the ball, but punch it; but you don't have to fully stretch for it. Perform this stroke like the flick (cocking the wrist, lifting the elbow, standing low, and starting behind the ball), but make contact with your bat in a vertical/neutral position, closing it slightly but very very quickly when punching the ball forward. The stroke is a snap of the wrist forward, given extra force by snapping the underarm. Always make contact with the ball on the same height, say a few inches above net-high, never wait for the ball to rise ven further; this will help to make the stroke consistent. This shot will be fast enough to aim it anywhere.

Check the following points when you are practising the shot:
- is the centre of my body behind the ball? (If not, work on your footwork.)
- am I low enough (face and shoulder at about the height of the ball)? (If not, crouch, bend your knees.)
- do I start the stroke behind the ball (as I should), instead of below it or beside it? (Never reach for the ball, it should come where your bat is waiting for it)
- do I lift my elbow to bring the underarm in a horizontal position? (If not, do this when you get low; it helps, because lifting the elbow - and cocking the wrist - is easier when your shoulder is going down and forward to the ball).
- do I get the moment of contact and height of the ball right? (If not, watch the ball closer and let it come to you until it is where you want it, having your bat ready there)
- do I snap my wrist fiercely on contact?
- do I snap it downward? (You shouldn't; the ball will end up in the net or go over the table - snap to the point on the table you are aiming at)
- do I close my bat a bit during the stroke stroke? (again, at the end of the stroke the face of the bat should point to the spot where the ball will hit the table)
- do I point after the ball, but keep my arm slightly crooked? (you will feel over-stretching in the inside of your elbow and the upper inside part of the under-arm; your arm should point but be relaxed)

When things go as they should, preparing for the moment to hit should be one fluent motion: getting low while coming in at the right place to be behind the ball and at the same time bringing your shoulder forward, the elbow up, cocking the wrist and ending up with the bat behind the ball - then hit it. Keep your eye on the ball at all times, so you know where it will be and you will go. Feel it.

It is not an easy stroke. Most players find playing with anti or pips difficult, because when you attack your timing must be exactly right and so must be the position of the bat and the motion of the arm. Using inverted, all of this is much less critical. On top of that, attacking with thin anti is more difficult than with thick anti, because you have less grip, especially on hard shots. So don't be surprised or disappointed if it takes a good while before you are able to do this consistently - it is only natural.

_________________
Without opponent, no match.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 14 Mar 2012, 01:20 
Offline
Horse Hockey!
User avatar

Joined: 03 Dec 2009, 03:25
Posts: 978
Location: North Carolina, USA
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 29 times
Kees wrote:
- do I lift my elbow to bring the underarm in a horizontal position? (If not, do this when you get low; it helps, because lifting the elbow - and cocking the wrist - is easier when your shoulder is going down and forward to the ball).
- do I snap it downward? (You shouldn't; the ball will end up in the net or go over the table - snap to the point on the table you are aiming at)

Thanks so much! These are all excellent points and very helpful. The two points I quoted above are exactly the things that I was at conflict with my coach. He kept telling me to keep my elbow down and to snap more downward than felt comfortable.

 

_________________
Giant Dragon Kris Special : RITC 802 w/Dawei 2.2 35d fh : : Donic Blue Fire M3 2.0 black bh
Member of Charlotte Table Tennis Club, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA
Visit Charlotte Table Tennis Club on Facebook


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 14 Mar 2012, 03:56 
Offline
Reverse Psychologist
Reverse Psychologist
User avatar

Joined: 17 Nov 2011, 02:09
Posts: 1469
Location: Belgium
Has thanked: 216 times
Been thanked: 272 times
Blade: BTY Joo Saehyuk
FH: Donic Bluefire JP 02
BH: Donic Spike P1 1.0
Kees wrote:
Yesterday I bought the Joola Toni Hold Anti Topspin in black 1.5 mm, to use it on a Joola Toni Hold Whitespot blade

If I had to compare it with an LP, I would say it comes very close to Feint Long III in many respects, including its tactical use, except that it has an even better (far better) control.


Hi Kees, as you already know I did a fantastic trade a few weeks ago, which included a 'free' black Toni Hold Anti Topspin ("THAT") with thickness 1.5mm. I have never used anti-top before and actually I can't get used to the idea of using it, so it's encouraging to read that you compare it with FLIII long pips, although I would expect that strokes are very different. Is chopping off the table feasible with THAT?

THWS is, according to tabletennisdb a slow, medium flexible and quite a soft blade. Are these characteristics ok for dealing with grippy anti-topspin rubbers? Do you think Donic Defplay Senso Classic would fit with THAT?

Someone in my team uses the same THAT too, and he is very efficient in active blocking and chopping close to table with it, combined with heavy topspin FH and smash. I could never beat him so far...

P.

_________________
Exclusive OOAK-Interview with Joo Saehyuk | Masato Shiono | Panagiotis Gionis


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 14 Mar 2012, 05:33 
Offline
OOAK Super User
OOAK Super User
User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2007, 01:37
Posts: 1652
Location: Netherlands
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 176 times
pipsy
Quote:
Is chopping off the table feasible with THAT?
It is made for it...

Quote:
THWS is, according to tabletennisdb a slow, medium flexible and quite a soft blade. Are these characteristics ok for dealing with grippy anti-topspin rubbers?
It is slow, rigid and medium hard. It pairs up excellently with any anti.

Quote:
Do you think Donic Defplay Senso Classic would fit with THAT?
I think it has balsa in it. So, no.

_________________
Without opponent, no match.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 17 Mar 2012, 06:27 
Offline
Horse Hockey!
User avatar

Joined: 03 Dec 2009, 03:25
Posts: 978
Location: North Carolina, USA
Has thanked: 2 times
Been thanked: 29 times
Played my first competition last night after about 3 weeks of practicing with the Nittaku Best Anti. It wasn't pretty. The worst match was against another anti-player using Bty Super Anti who beat me 3-0 (who I've only lost to once before out of perhaps a dozen matches when I was using Pogo or Talon on my bh). After all the matches were over for the night one of the 1st Division players who is an LP chopper (2000+ USATT rating) gave me a friendly hit and lots of advice and practice against really fast and spinny loops. He showed me that I really need to concentrate on a light grip, blocking right off the bounce and trying to get a double-bounce ball or at least just off the edge where it is hard to loop. However, when he gave me dead balls with his LPs I struggled with even getting it back on the table. Underspin balls (of course) give me the least trouble.

I feel a bit discouraged and feel like I've taken a big step backwards. I know I need to give it some time. I do feel I'm able to be a bit more aggressive than I was with LPs but my service return is worse. The Best Anti is definitely more sensitive to spin than any of the LPs I've tried! I know that's good for attacking, but I really have to start concentrating on what spin I'm getting, especially on serve return. With LPs I got lazy I guess because I could return just about anything wherever I wanted it to go on the table without paying much attention except whether it was topspin or underspin. It was after returning serve and during rallies that the LPs often proved to be a weakness against stronger players. That's why I decided to try the anti for more attacking capability yet still be able to play defensively when necessary.

After playing with LPs for a year and a half I'm seeing that playing with grippy anti requires completely different technique. I'm going to pull out my robot this weekend and see if some concentrated practice will help give me some confidence.

 

_________________
Giant Dragon Kris Special : RITC 802 w/Dawei 2.2 35d fh : : Donic Blue Fire M3 2.0 black bh
Member of Charlotte Table Tennis Club, Charlotte, North Carolina, USA
Visit Charlotte Table Tennis Club on Facebook


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: 17 Mar 2012, 19:21 
Offline
OOAK Super User
OOAK Super User
User avatar

Joined: 17 Feb 2007, 01:37
Posts: 1652
Location: Netherlands
Has thanked: 0 time
Been thanked: 176 times
cyber1call
Quote:
After playing with LPs for a year and a half I'm seeing that playing with grippy anti requires completely different technique. I'm going to pull out my robot this weekend and see if some concentrated practice will help give me some confidence.
The main problem would be that playing close to the table defensively with grippy anti is per se far less effective than doing it with LP, especially less grippy LP. Playing with anti, as a rule needs slick anti for close to the table defensive play and/or attacking backspin by aggressive pushing, grippy anti for close to the table allround/attack play, grippy anti for chopping/attacking play, either grippy or slick anti for classic defence away from the table. So perhaps your choice of anti is not ideal for your style of play. That issue really merits some reflection, as you can either change your anti or adapt/change your style. I may misunderstand, and I definitely don't have the complte picture of what you want to achieve, but ld guess the primary question to ask yourself would be: I want to be aggressive with my anti, but am I able to keep it up in matches, or do I actually need resource to ways of slowing down play, including passive short blocking with spinreversal? If you want to be aggressive and take the initiative in the rally with the anti, and you are capable of keeping it up, you do need a grippy anti, for no other anti will effectively attack topspin. But as it is hard and rather ineffective to block short with grippy anti, you do have to be aggressive all the time - that isn't exactly easy. If you want to be aggressive with the anti, but only occasionally, than you can add moving away from from the table and chopping to your standard tactics. If you do not want that, you should change to slick anti, but that means virtually giving up taking the initiative attacking topspin.

As for receiving serve: the essential difference between LP and anti is that with anti you have to receive serve actively. If you make a stroke with the anti, no incoming spin should be a problem; but if you just block like with LP, problems will be plentiful. If you are going to practice against the robot, first learn how to deal with sidespin - a quick punch, contacting the ball on the top of the bounce is easiest. After that learn how to deal with fast topspin - again a quick punch on the top is best, but for that you have to see it coming. Dealing with backspin is easier, more like using LP, but your stroke should be performed faster. Then there is one stroke that will take care of any incoming spin: keep the blade vertical and contact the ball (starting the stroke behind it) on the rise or on the top moving your blade very quickly sideways (forward motion should be minimal), aiming for a corner or sideline which is out of reach for the opponent.

_________________
Without opponent, no match.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 68 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5  Next




All times are UTC + 9:30 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Copyright 2012 OOAK Table Tennis Forum. The information on this site cannot be reused without written permission.

Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group




Don't forget to 'LIKE' our forum on Facebook if you enjoy the content: