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PostPosted: 07 Dec 2017, 13:26 
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NextLevel's post is good. Slowing down and learning to rally is a good idea.

If you have sorted out how your body works, that's a massive step. All you need now is to get better through training and match exposure.

6 months is nothing in this sport.

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PostPosted: 08 Dec 2017, 06:18 
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Brett Clarke wrote:
fastmover wrote:
Well my point is that when I tried to make sure my right foot was pointing outwards I was imitating the form without understanding the content. Due to rudimentary leg rotation the foot movement didn't assist the stroke much. I guess the same should stand for the serve, and I used to serve with my feet parallel.


Your feet should be parallel to the table on the serve.


Well, it is not that I am trying to mess with you, but...

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PostPosted: 08 Dec 2017, 09:25 
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fastmover wrote:
Brett Clarke wrote:
fastmover wrote:
Well my point is that when I tried to make sure my right foot was pointing outwards I was imitating the form without understanding the content. Due to rudimentary leg rotation the foot movement didn't assist the stroke much. I guess the same should stand for the serve, and I used to serve with my feet parallel.


Your feet should be parallel to the table on the serve.


Well, it is not that I am trying to mess with you, but...

Image


I'm calling that close to both feet being parallel to the table. One is completely and the other is on a bit of an angle. I just stood up to do a shadow serve and both my feet were very side on and it felt normal

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PostPosted: 09 Dec 2017, 06:52 
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Brett,

When you originally wrote your response to fastmover, I really felt you meant body positioning parallel to the table and that the precise foot positioning should support the rotation.

I don't think there is ever a time that the feet should both be parallel to each other when performing table tennis strokes including serves. Had I known and emphasized this when I was coming up, I may not as been as heavily backhand oriented as this was in part the reason I was - I never had the feet spread out to support my rotation.

Could be wrong but that's how I see it. Fast mover is intrigued by the details now and I think it is good to find this kind of stuff our earlier in your training than to have to pick it up later when you have gotten decent with lots of bad habits and good strokes supported because of or despite it.

If you are on the balls of your feet, it does matter a little less though as you can rotate over that.

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PostPosted: 09 Dec 2017, 18:22 
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NextLevel wrote:
I don't think there is ever a time that the feet should both be parallel to each other when performing table tennis strokes including serves.


Harimoto often gets both feet close to parallel to the table, even on his forehand topspin. Depending on the player, I'm starting to teach this type of forehand.

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PostPosted: 09 Dec 2017, 18:31 
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I was just told the same thing this week, to keep my feet roughly parallel on the fh. I was turning my right foot out, but the logic was since my hips are still facing the table I only really get shoulder rotation into the fh.

Regardless of whether that improves my fh I think the discipline of picking up both feet all the time will be great for balance and smaller position adjustments.


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PostPosted: 09 Dec 2017, 22:35 
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I guess playing on the balls of your feet to the point you look like Spiderman when looping makes that possible.

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PostPosted: 10 Dec 2017, 11:59 
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Just to be clear, this isn't my standard way of teaching the forehand topspin. I'm much more likely to suggest this on the backspin serve.

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PostPosted: 10 Dec 2017, 12:39 
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Brett Clarke wrote:
6 months is nothing in this sport.


Yeah sums up my last 6 months :D

This comment is so true and while you can make progress in 6 months, it is never as much as you'd hope.


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PostPosted: 10 Dec 2017, 13:52 
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wilkinru wrote:
Yeah sums up my last 6 months :D

This comment is so true and while you can make progress in 6 months, it is never as much as you'd hope.


This is a bit too pessimistic... in your case, I don't think you are getting the kind of coaching and feedback that would make quick differences to your game. Given where you are located, I would look into attending a Stellan Bengsston camp and just absorbing a week of good table tennis coaching and feedback.

While it is true that it can be tough to make improvements within 6 months, what Brett really means is that this is a sport/hobby you will be playing for most of your life if you are that into it and that 6 months to improve in that context is nothing, given that many people try to but do not improve at all or can take longer periods to improve. But plenty of the lack of improvement at the lower levels is just tied to bad coaching or self-coaching that results in capped technique. You can get many people to improve in 3 months if they have the playing time and the right environment. As adults with jobs etc., its not that easy though to always find time. But if you can see a path that gives you improvement in 6 months and you have the resource to invest, take it. But many people do improve over periods of 6 months or less, though usually, fully integrating technical changes into your game to a level that you are comfortable and highly efficient can take 2 years. Good technique is a gift that keeps on giving.

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PostPosted: 11 Dec 2017, 09:57 
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Well I've gone from losing to 1675 players to beating them (I'd say the point spread went from -12 over 4 games to +10 over 4 games.).

So progress is there but I think a lot of that just has to do with playing more often, fitness being better.

Real stroke improvement is very difficult to find in a match.

My forehand is but it's still inconsistent to say the least, tho at 50% power it is pretty solid.
Over the table play is much better over the last month, I now have a better bad flick. I really lack in this area. I literally won my first ever point doing a flick during a rally this week (not just serve return).
Blocking has likely been my biggest improvement to my game in 2017...I had no block a couple of months ago.

One thing you really don't learn is blocking with the robot or if you don't play people who can't loop.


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PostPosted: 11 Dec 2017, 10:44 
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Yeah, I meant 6 months is nothing in the context of a player's career. You can still achieve good things in 6 months.

ETTS45 is now available on ttEDGE.com and it will appear to be repeated information to more advanced players. I have, however, received a lot of member footage where the player hasn't been able to grasp LTT80 and LTT81. This video is for those members.

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PostPosted: 11 Dec 2017, 18:38 
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wilkinru wrote:
Real stroke improvement is very difficult to find in a match.
...

Blocking has likely been my biggest improvement to my game in 2017...I had no block a couple of months ago.


Matches are not the best place to look for stroke improvement, too many variables. Are you confident enough to use new technique? Does the ball placement allow for it? Can the opponent create that situation?

If you have learned to block and you couldn't before that's a massive improvement. Flicking is completely unnecessary up to usatt 1900 or higher, but blocking is essential from about 1600. It's not glamorous like a big fh loop or killer FZD flick, but a point is a point however you win it.

And +1 on NL's suggestion if you can get to a camp. They can really accelerate your progress. You will only retain 20-50% of what you learn, depending on the amount and quality of your training at home, but when you are getting two weeks worth of training in a day it still works in your favor.

And while the internet is wonderful, and ttedge is the best thing online, there really is no substitute for live coaching. There just isn't.


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PostPosted: 13 Dec 2017, 07:11 
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BRS wrote:
And while the internet is wonderful, and ttedge is the best thing online, there really is no substitute for live coaching. There just isn't.


For starters, a video doesn't necessarily related to your immediate issues. The information is generic and only enhances your general knowledge. You need a coach to see you play and sometimes feed balls so you can work on stuff.

Often the line between coaching and training is blurred. There are many different types of coaches and they all have their own take on the game. That said, I know there is a direct correlation between coaching and improvement/good technique. A part of the equation is the keenest players seek out coaches. Another part is that most coaches have a pretty good idea of how proper table tennis is played.

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PostPosted: 13 Dec 2017, 18:38 
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Brett Clarke wrote:
BRS wrote:
And while the internet is wonderful, and ttedge is the best thing online, there really is no substitute for live coaching. There just isn't.


For starters, a video doesn't necessarily related to your immediate issues. The information is generic and only enhances your general knowledge. You need a coach to see you play and sometimes feed balls so you can work on stuff.

Often the line between coaching and training is blurred. There are many different types of coaches and they all have their own take on the game. That said, I know there is a direct correlation between coaching and improvement/good technique. A part of the equation is the keenest players seek out coaches. Another part is that most coaches have a pretty good idea of how proper table tennis is played.


I meant no criticism of ttedge, but it seems obvious to me that all of us on this thread would make faster progress if we were in Melbourne taking lessons with you in person than we are using videos and forum posts. That being impossible at least we do have this.


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