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PostPosted: 11 Nov 2020, 08:49 
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Hi,

Someone has told me and most of them actually said that Mark V is best for starter as well to those who want to improve their skill.

How true is this?

Thanks

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PostPosted: 11 Nov 2020, 11:30 
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It's a fine choice.


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PostPosted: 11 Nov 2020, 15:47 
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dyubert wrote:
Hi,

Someone has told me and most of them actually said that Mark V is best for starter as well to those who want to improve their skill.

How true is this?

Thanks

Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk


Yes, Mark V being a user-friendly allrounder, is a typical recommendation, and not a bad one .. Infact, it was one of my first rubbers, when I was a beginner... I yet have Mark V on one of my setups...

However, if you're developing strokes/technique, then I would strongly suggest Chinese tacky rubber ... here's my reasoning (For convenience, I've simply Copy/pasted from another thread, where I had posted the same.. Sorry, I don't know how to link posts)

Here's what I feel, based on my experience with a few Chinese Tacky rubbers (especially ones by 729, Globe, and then DHS), especially, ones from the pre-40mm and plastic ball era...

A lot of the tradition chinese tacky rubbers have a low-throw, are spin-sensitive, tend to be hard'ish, the ball does not sink in much, are on the heavier side...Hence, the combination of these factors, makes these rubbers, sort-of, less forgiving, and more demanding (compared to beginner-level Euro/Jap rubbers) , from a technique aspect. Take looping, for instance - Since the ball does not sink into the rubber as much (compared to Euro/Jap style rubbers), and since the rubbers tend to have a low-throw, a player, may be forced to loop with a proper brushing action...and if the brushing action is proper, I feel, the quality of the loop is better, generally speaking.... Where I am, most coaches, emphasize of proper brushing action, for loops...

Another advantage of using tacky rubbers, for beginners, is service receive .. Since they tend to be sensitive to spin, receiving serves requires more technique. This same spin-sensitivity, make it harder to lift-backpsin, without proper technique... These rubbers, also tend to be rather spinny..

Chinese rubbers are also recommended for learning/improving/playing a short-game...

So, to me, the very fact that these rubbers can be rather un-forgiving, if the technique is not correct, makes them a good choice, for someone still learning the ropes..

I'm not saying that it's impossible to learn with Euro/Jap rubbers... The above is just based on my personal experience..


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PostPosted: 11 Nov 2020, 16:29 
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Mark V is more than 50 years old and too expensive for what it is. I think there are better and cheaper options for someone just starting out.

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PostPosted: 11 Nov 2020, 18:31 
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The Mark V is still pretty decent, as an entry-level rubber... However, @ around $30, it is a bit on the expensive side (for an entry-level rubber) ... You'd get better, or equally good rubbers, for a lot cheaper...

Check-out Sanwei T88-III, or if you'd like something a bit faster and less tacky, then Friendship Focus III Snipe or even Palio Biotech CJ8000 39°-41°

For the price of one Mark V, you'd get 2 or even 3 of the above-mentioned rubbers.


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PostPosted: 12 Nov 2020, 00:46 
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ootbs wrote:
dyubert wrote:
Hi,

Someone has told me and most of them actually said that Mark V is best for starter as well to those who want to improve their skill.

How true is this?

Thanks

Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk


Yes, Mark V being a user-friendly allrounder, is a typical recommendation, and not a bad one .. Infact, it was one of my first rubbers, when I was a beginner... I yet have Mark V on one of my setups...

However, if you're developing strokes/technique, then I would strongly suggest Chinese tacky rubber ... here's my reasoning (For convenience, I've simply Copy/pasted from another thread, where I had posted the same.. Sorry, I don't know how to link posts)

Here's what I feel, based on my experience with a few Chinese Tacky rubbers (especially ones by 729, Globe, and then DHS), especially, ones from the pre-40mm and plastic ball era...

A lot of the tradition chinese tacky rubbers have a low-throw, are spin-sensitive, tend to be hard'ish, the ball does not sink in much, are on the heavier side...Hence, the combination of these factors, makes these rubbers, sort-of, less forgiving, and more demanding (compared to beginner-level Euro/Jap rubbers) , from a technique aspect. Take looping, for instance - Since the ball does not sink into the rubber as much (compared to Euro/Jap style rubbers), and since the rubbers tend to have a low-throw, a player, may be forced to loop with a proper brushing action...and if the brushing action is proper, I feel, the quality of the loop is better, generally speaking.... Where I am, most coaches, emphasize of proper brushing action, for loops...

Another advantage of using tacky rubbers, for beginners, is service receive .. Since they tend to be sensitive to spin, receiving serves requires more technique. This same spin-sensitivity, make it harder to lift-backpsin, without proper technique... These rubbers, also tend to be rather spinny..

Chinese rubbers are also recommended for learning/improving/playing a short-game...

So, to me, the very fact that these rubbers can be rather un-forgiving, if the technique is not correct, makes them a good choice, for someone still learning the ropes..

I'm not saying that it's impossible to learn with Euro/Jap rubbers... The above is just based on my personal experience..


I couldn’t agree more. I was going to suggest the same. One thing I would add, is that these slow/dead rubbers will force you to learn how to (hopefully) properly use your body (legs, hips, shoulder, arm, wrist) more effectively.


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PostPosted: 12 Nov 2020, 07:40 
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All that has been said is true. I still say mark v is fine, if $30 is acceptable. Sometimes it's better to just get out there and play.


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PostPosted: 12 Nov 2020, 08:43 
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Nittaku factive or xiom vega intro are some good and more modern alternatives


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PostPosted: 12 Nov 2020, 08:58 
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wilkinru wrote:
All that has been said is true. I still say mark v is fine, if $30 is acceptable. Sometimes it's better to just get out there and play.
This is the most true- practice.


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PostPosted: 12 Nov 2020, 11:48 
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ootbs wrote:
dyubert wrote:
Hi,

Someone has told me and most of them actually said that Mark V is best for starter as well to those who want to improve their skill.

How true is this?

Thanks

Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk


Yes, Mark V being a user-friendly allrounder, is a typical recommendation, and not a bad one .. Infact, it was one of my first rubbers, when I was a beginner... I yet have Mark V on one of my setups...

However, if you're developing strokes/technique, then I would strongly suggest Chinese tacky rubber ... here's my reasoning (For convenience, I've simply Copy/pasted from another thread, where I had posted the same.. Sorry, I don't know how to link posts)

Here's what I feel, based on my experience with a few Chinese Tacky rubbers (especially ones by 729, Globe, and then DHS), especially, ones from the pre-40mm and plastic ball era...

A lot of the tradition chinese tacky rubbers have a low-throw, are spin-sensitive, tend to be hard'ish, the ball does not sink in much, are on the heavier side...Hence, the combination of these factors, makes these rubbers, sort-of, less forgiving, and more demanding (compared to beginner-level Euro/Jap rubbers) , from a technique aspect. Take looping, for instance - Since the ball does not sink into the rubber as much (compared to Euro/Jap style rubbers), and since the rubbers tend to have a low-throw, a player, may be forced to loop with a proper brushing action...and if the brushing action is proper, I feel, the quality of the loop is better, generally speaking.... Where I am, most coaches, emphasize of proper brushing action, for loops...

Another advantage of using tacky rubbers, for beginners, is service receive .. Since they tend to be sensitive to spin, receiving serves requires more technique. This same spin-sensitivity, make it harder to lift-backpsin, without proper technique... These rubbers, also tend to be rather spinny..

Chinese rubbers are also recommended for learning/improving/playing a short-game...

So, to me, the very fact that these rubbers can be rather un-forgiving, if the technique is not correct, makes them a good choice, for someone still learning the ropes..

I'm not saying that it's impossible to learn with Euro/Jap rubbers... The above is just based on my personal experience..
This is well explained...thanks sir

Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk


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PostPosted: 13 Nov 2020, 21:52 
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ootbs wrote:
dyubert wrote:
Hi,

Someone has told me and most of them actually said that Mark V is best for starter as well to those who want to improve their skill.

How true is this?

Thanks

Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk


Yes, Mark V being a user-friendly allrounder, is a typical recommendation, and not a bad one .. Infact, it was one of my first rubbers, when I was a beginner... I yet have Mark V on one of my setups...

However, if you're developing strokes/technique, then I would strongly suggest Chinese tacky rubber ... here's my reasoning (For convenience, I've simply Copy/pasted from another thread, where I had posted the same.. Sorry, I don't know how to link posts)

Here's what I feel, based on my experience with a few Chinese Tacky rubbers (especially ones by 729, Globe, and then DHS), especially, ones from the pre-40mm and plastic ball era...

A lot of the tradition chinese tacky rubbers have a low-throw, are spin-sensitive, tend to be hard'ish, the ball does not sink in much, are on the heavier side...Hence, the combination of these factors, makes these rubbers, sort-of, less forgiving, and more demanding (compared to beginner-level Euro/Jap rubbers) , from a technique aspect. Take looping, for instance - Since the ball does not sink into the rubber as much (compared to Euro/Jap style rubbers), and since the rubbers tend to have a low-throw, a player, may be forced to loop with a proper brushing action...and if the brushing action is proper, I feel, the quality of the loop is better, generally speaking.... Where I am, most coaches, emphasize of proper brushing action, for loops...

Another advantage of using tacky rubbers, for beginners, is service receive .. Since they tend to be sensitive to spin, receiving serves requires more technique. This same spin-sensitivity, make it harder to lift-backpsin, without proper technique... These rubbers, also tend to be rather spinny..

Chinese rubbers are also recommended for learning/improving/playing a short-game...

So, to me, the very fact that these rubbers can be rather un-forgiving, if the technique is not correct, makes them a good choice, for someone still learning the ropes..

I'm not saying that it's impossible to learn with Euro/Jap rubbers... The above is just based on my personal experience..
For me, the best entry level rubbers are Kokutaku 868 and they are fine also for advanced players. Not to mention that they usually cost 7-8$/sheet on AliExpress. Or you can combine Kokutaku 868 on forehand with Sanwei T88 Ultra Spin on backhand, in order to have a classic modern chinese setup with a grippy rubber on backhand and tacky forehand.

Sent from my moto g(7) power using Tapatalk


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PostPosted: 15 Nov 2020, 03:14 
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That reminds me. I've got a couple sheets of the T88-whatchamacallit (the new ones that Sanwei recommends on the backhand, that are cut in the weird shape, like Target National, which they recommend on the forehand). Should try them out.

Come to think of it.. I haven't bought any new sheets for 6-8 months... :lol:

Iskandar


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PostPosted: 30 Jan 2021, 07:38 
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ootbs wrote:
dyubert wrote:
Hi,

Someone has told me and most of them actually said that Mark V is best for starter as well to those who want to improve their skill.

How true is this?

Thanks

Sent from my SM-N960F using Tapatalk


Yes, Mark V being a user-friendly allrounder, is a typical recommendation, and not a bad one .. Infact, it was one of my first rubbers, when I was a beginner... I yet have Mark V on one of my setups...

However, if you're developing strokes/technique, then I would strongly suggest Chinese tacky rubber ... here's my reasoning (For convenience, I've simply Copy/pasted from another thread, where I had posted the same.. Sorry, I don't know how to link posts)

Here's what I feel, based on my experience with a few Chinese Tacky rubbers (especially ones by 729, Globe, and then DHS), especially, ones from the pre-40mm and plastic ball era...

A lot of the tradition chinese tacky rubbers have a low-throw, are spin-sensitive, tend to be hard'ish, the ball does not sink in much, are on the heavier side...Hence, the combination of these factors, makes these rubbers, sort-of, less forgiving, and more demanding (compared to beginner-level Euro/Jap rubbers) , from a technique aspect. Take looping, for instance - Since the ball does not sink into the rubber as much (compared to Euro/Jap style rubbers), and since the rubbers tend to have a low-throw, a player, may be forced to loop with a proper brushing action...and if the brushing action is proper, I feel, the quality of the loop is better, generally speaking.... Where I am, most coaches, emphasize of proper brushing action, for loops...

Another advantage of using tacky rubbers, for beginners, is service receive .. Since they tend to be sensitive to spin, receiving serves requires more technique. This same spin-sensitivity, make it harder to lift-backpsin, without proper technique... These rubbers, also tend to be rather spinny..

Chinese rubbers are also recommended for learning/improving/playing a short-game...

So, to me, the very fact that these rubbers can be rather un-forgiving, if the technique is not correct, makes them a good choice, for someone still learning the ropes..

I'm not saying that it's impossible to learn with Euro/Jap rubbers... The above is just based on my personal experience..


1000% agree with this!

A beginner whos serious should get cheap basic racket with cheap tacky Chinese rubber, both of which can be purchased for much much cheaper than any Euro/Jap option. Learn stroke basisc and learn how the ball feels.

I see so many beginners who decide they want a real setup and are told to get a $$$ tensor etc which makes them develop terrible habits and bad strokes they will never recover from.


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